porpentine


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porpentine

(ˈpɔːpənˌtaɪn)
n
(Animals) a literary word for porcupine
References in periodicals archive ?
But that I am forbid To tell the secrets of my prison house, I could a tale unfold whose lightest word Would harrow up thy soul, freeze thy young blood, Make thy two eyes like stars start from their spheres, Thy knotted and combined locks to part, And each particular hair to stand an end Like quills upon the fearful porpentine.
But that I am forbid To tell the secrets of my prison-house, I could a tale unfold whose lightest word Would harrow up thy soul, freeze thy young blood, Make thy two eyes like stars start from their spheres, Thy knotted and combined locks to part, And each particular hair to stand on end Like quills upon the fretful porpentine [frightened porcupine] (I.
Schoenmaker piecing together a nose, Porpentine falling from a window, or Benny Profane shooting an alligator, every attempt to control experience can be seen as a reaction to an encounter that is only partially perceived.
Odd that he should have said porpentine when he meant porcupine.
In the story, Porpentine plays a public role as a stereotypic buffoon, given to strange masks while Goodfellow, his much younger partner, publicly assumes the role of womanizer.
Spy-spying-on-spy thus evolves into courtship: though Moldweorp and Porpentine act for enemy governments, their relations with each other are "tender and sheepish" (102), and, when, during a performance of Manon Lescaut, they finally come face to face at the assassination of Lord Cromer, Porpentine "glanced back, quickly at that moment of hopeless love, and saw Moldweorp there looking decayed, incredibly old, face set in a hideous though compassionate smile" (133).
Earlier, when Porpentine drops below his "threshold" to discover that his partner is sexually impotent and briefly considers the implications of that discovery on his own sexuality, he acts as if he has learned nothing.
For example, in "Low-lands," Dennis wants to escape "the relentless rationality of that womb [psychoanalysis] and that wife" (58), and, in "Under the Rose," Victoria Wren, who speaks to Porpentine with "a mustache of foam on her upper lip" (130), recognizes that because he is her sexual rival as well as her lover's partner, she thus enters the space that Porpentine himself refuses to articulate.
Although Porpentine dons such a mask consciously, others usually do not recognize that they are in drag, for to know would contaminate their safe space.
For instance, when Porpentine dons the mask, he thinks it will distract attention from himself.
Likewise in "Under the Rose," when Porpentine masquerades as the operatic Des Grieux, however playfully, he performs an identity that protects him from a reality that he represses.
It should be noted that since the action does not really involve the courtesan's house, when the play was performed at a public playhouse, the actors playing Antipholus of Ephesus and Dromio of Ephesus might not have bothered to use their entry door as the door of the Porpentine.