porpoise


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por·poise

 (pôr′pəs)
n. pl. porpoise or por·pois·es
1. Any of various marine toothed whales of the genus Phocoena and related genera, characteristically having a blunt snout and a triangular dorsal fin. Porpoises are placed either in their own family, Phocoenidae, or with the dolphins in the family Delphinidae.
2. Any of several related aquatic mammals, such as the dolphins.

[Middle English porpeis, from Old French (probably translation of a Germanic compound meaning sea-pig) : porc, pig (from Latin porcus; see porko- in Indo-European roots) + peis, fish (from Latin piscis).]

porpoise

(ˈpɔːpəs)
n, pl -poises or -poise
1. (Animals) any of various small cetacean mammals of the genus Phocaena and related genera, having a blunt snout and many teeth: family Delphinidae (or Phocaenidae)
2. (Animals) (not in technical use) any of various related cetaceans, esp the dolphin
[C14: from French pourpois, from Medieval Latin porcopiscus (from Latin porcus pig + piscis fish), replacing Latin porcus marīnus sea pig]

por•poise

(ˈpɔr pəs)

n., pl. (esp. collectively) -poise, (esp. for kinds or species) -pois•es, n.
1. any of certain toothed cetaceans of the family Delphinidae having a blunt, rounded snout, esp. of the genus Phocoena, as the common porpoise, P. phocoena, of the Atlantic and Pacific. Compare dolphin.
v.i.
2. (of a speeding motorboat) to leap clear of the water after striking a wave.
3. (of a vehicle) to move forward with an alternately rising and falling motion.
[1275–1325; Middle English porpoys < Middle French porpois < Vulgar Latin *porcopiscis hog fish, for Latin porcus marīnus sea hog]
por′poise•like`, adj.

por·poise

(pôr′pəs)
Any of several small, toothed whales having a blunt snout and a triangular dorsal fin. Compare dolphin.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.porpoise - any of several small gregarious cetacean mammals having a blunt snout and many teethporpoise - any of several small gregarious cetacean mammals having a blunt snout and many teeth
dolphin - any of various small toothed whales with a beaklike snout; larger than porpoises
harbor porpoise, herring hog, Phocoena phocoena - the common porpoise of the northern Atlantic and Pacific
Phocoena sinus, vaquita - a short porpoise that lives in the Gulf of California; an endangered species

porpoise

noun
Related words
collective nouns school, gam
Translations
دُلْفين، خَنْزير البَحْر
sviňucha
marsvin
pyöriäinen
hnísa
돌고래
jūrų kiaulė
jūrascūka, cūkdelfīns
morświn
sviňucha
domuz balığı

porpoise

[ˈpɔːpəs] N (porpoise or porpoises (pl)) → marsopa f, puerco m de mar

porpoise

[ˈpɔːrpəs] nmarsouin m

porpoise

nTümmler m

porpoise

[ˈpɔːpəs] nfocena

porpoise

(ˈpoːpəs) noun
a type of blunt-nosed sea animal of the dolphin family.
References in classic literature ?
There's a porpoise close behind us, and he's treading on my tail.
In a little time," she said, "you'll know where to swim to, but just now we'll follow Sea Pig, the Porpoise, for he is very wise.
Father Dennis, whose duty was in the rear, to smooth the trouble of the wounded, had naturally managed to make his way to the foremost of his boys, and lay like a black porpoise, at length on the grass.
The arrival of the nostrils of Benjamin into their own atmosphere was announced by a breathing that would have done credit to a porpoise.
Swimming was his only accomplishment; he felt at home in the water; and soon he had them all imitating him as he played at being a porpoise, and a drowning man, and a fat lady afraid of wetting her hair.
Me want 'm tobacco, plenty fella tobacco; me want 'm calico; me want 'm porpoise teeth; me want 'm one fella belt.
Nothing they wore in the way of clothing, but from around each of their necks he removed a necklace of porpoise teeth that was worth a gold sovereign in mere exchange value.
There's more money in oysters," the Porpoise remarked dryly.
By the time we dragged him out of that, his madness had shifted to the belief that he was a great swimmer, and the next moment he was overboard and demonstrating his ability by floundering like a sick porpoise and swallowing much salt water.
What can be more curious than that the hand of a man, formed for grasping, that of a mole for digging, the leg of the horse, the paddle of the porpoise, and the wing of the bat, should all be constructed on the same pattern, and should include the same bones, in the same relative positions?
One would have thought that Pinocchio had turned into a porpoise playing in the sun.
The last thing Miss Jenny saw, as she looked back before closing the room door, was Mr Fledgeby in the act of plunging and gambolling all over his bed, like a porpoise or dolphin in its native element.