porringer


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por·rin·ger

 (pôr′ĭn-jər, pŏr′-)
n.
A shallow cup or bowl with a handle.

[Middle English, alteration of potinger, potager, from Old French potager, from potage, soup; see pottage.]

porringer

(ˈpɒrɪndʒə)
n
(Cookery) a small dish, often with a handle, for soup, porridge, etc
[C16: changed from Middle English potinger, poteger, from Old French potager, from potage soup, contents of a pot; see pottage]

por•rin•ger

(ˈpɔr ɪn dʒər, ˈpɒr-)

n.
a low dish or cup, often with a handle, from which soup, porridge, or the like is eaten.
[1515–25; variant of earlier poddinger, akin to late Middle English potinger, alter., with inserted nasal, of potager < Middle French. See pottage, -er2]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.porringer - a shallow metal bowl (usually with a handle)porringer - a shallow metal bowl (usually with a handle); "the child was eating pottage from a porringer"
bowl - a dish that is round and open at the top for serving foods
Translations
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References in classic literature ?
When the witch saw that the children had escaped her, she was furious, and, hitting the cat with a porringer, she said: 'Why did you let the children leave the hut?
When he had given him this information, and a tin porringer containing his breakfast, the man locked him up again; and went clattering along the stone passage, opening and shutting a great many other doors, and raising numberless loud echoes which resounded through the building for a long time, as if they were in prison too, and unable to get out.
Hunger rattled its dry bones among the roasting chestnuts in the turned cylinder; Hunger was shred into atomics in every farthing porringer of husky chips of potato, fried with some reluctant drops of oil.
When the bundle was made up for, or on what occasion laid where I found it, I knew not, but when I came to open it I found there was a suit of childbed-linen in it, very good and almost new, the lace very fine; there was a silver porringer of a pint, a small silver mug and six spoons, with some other linen, a good smock, and three silk handkerchiefs, and in the mug, wrapped up in a paper, 18s.
Of this festive composition each boy had one porringer, and no more--except on occasions of great public rejoicing, when he had two ounces and a quarter of bread besides.
The pretty girl went upstairs, leaving Rene to finish his porringer of buckwheat in boiled milk.
She had been very good to me, but I cannot remember that she ever petted me much; besides, she worked out in the fields like a man, poor thing; and if she fondled me at times, she also used to rap my fingers with the spoon if I ate the soup too fast out of the porringer we had between us.
In Dickens's representation of the last years of the anden regime, when the storm (the major extended macro-metaphor of the novel (5)) was slowly gathering in the sea of human suffering, the "Hunger" of lower-class Parisians is said to be "shred into atomies in every farthing porringer of husky chips of potato, fried with some reluctant drops of oil" (33).
Sally Porringer, the wife of Harry's CIA superior, offers him ample material for obsession.
According to Captain Matt Porringer, one of the Marines who developed the idea of FETs, "What we wanted to do in Afghanistan that took the Lioness concept even further was to put the focus not on searching women, but on actually engaging with them and learning about what was happening in the areas .
First there's my wife in the leading strings of a squinting fanatical field preacher, who has turned her brain--then comes Johanna and her heroics as she calls em, and then there's Cecily with her penny porringer of annoyance--the daughter of an old faithful servant, she's been bred up with my children till she actually looks upon herself as one of them, and everybody, even the pious Mr.
Galt," says Porringer, "was first of all a man of the Enlightenment, a sceptic .