portal vein


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Related to portal vein: Portal vein thrombosis, Portal venous system

portal vein

n.
A vein that conducts blood from the digestive organs, spleen, pancreas, and gallbladder to the liver.

portal vein

n
(Anatomy) any vein connecting two capillary networks, esp in the liver (hepatic portal vein)

por′tal vein′


n.
a large vein conveying blood to the liver from the veins of the stomach, intestine, spleen, and pancreas.
[1835–45]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.portal vein - a short vein that carries blood into the liver
portal system - system of veins that carry blood from the abdominal organs to the liver
vein, vena, venous blood vessel - a blood vessel that carries blood from the capillaries toward the heart; "all veins except the pulmonary vein carry unaerated blood"
Translations

portal vein

nPfortader f

por·tal vein

n. vena porta, vena formada por varias ramas de venas que provienen de órganos abdominales.
References in periodicals archive ?
Many techniques and technologies have been developed to improve localization and access to the portal vein (1).
Pancreatic islet transplantation is an extremely promising cure for insulin-sensitive diabetes mellitus (ISDM), but side effects of lifelong systemic immunosuppressive therapy, short supply of donor islets and their poor survival and efficacy in the portal vein limit the application of the current clinical procedure to the most at-risk brittle Type I diabetes (T1D) sufferers.
There was poor opacification of segmental branches of left portal vein in segment II and III.
In the liver, granulomas may also be observed, as well as fibrosis of the portal vein.
The rate of portal vein complications, including portal vein stenosis (PVS), is between 4% and 8%.
An abdominal computed tomography angiogram confirmed hepatosplenomegaly and a dilated portal vein.
The portal vein is important for securing the exogenous N that is utilized by parenteral tissues.
Patients with advanced HCC with or without portal vein thrombosis or whose disease has progressed after chemoembolization or recurrence of HCC;
Computed tomography (CT) demonstrated a conglomerate of dilated vessels in the region of the porta hepatis with an intrahepatic portosystemic venous shunt, also known as a portal hepatic venous shunt, between the right portal vein and the middle hepatic vein (Figs 1a and 1b).
Generally, portal vein thrombosis (PVT) may be observed with a rate of 2-54% and deep vein thrombosis may be observed with a rate of 1.