portcullis


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port·cul·lis

 (pôrt-kŭl′ĭs)
n.
A grating of iron or wooden bars or slats, suspended in the gateway of a fortified place and lowered to block passage.

[Middle English port-colice, from Old French porte coleice, sliding gate : porte, gate (from Latin porta; see per- in Indo-European roots) + coleice, feminine of coleis, sliding (from Vulgar Latin *cōlātīcius, from Latin cōlātus, past participle of cōlāre, to filter, strain, from cōlum, sieve).]

portcullis

(pɔːtˈkʌlɪs)
n
(Architecture) an iron or wooden grating suspended vertically in grooves in the gateway of a castle or fortified town and able to be lowered so as to bar the entrance
[C14 port colice, from Old French porte coleïce sliding gate, from porte door, entrance + coleïce, from couler to slide, flow, from Late Latin cōlāre to filter]

port•cul•lis

(pɔrtˈkʌl ɪs, poʊrt-)

n.
a strong grating, as of iron, made to slide along vertical grooves at the sides of the gateway of a castle or fortified place and let down to prevent passage.
[1300–50; Middle English portecolys < Middle French porte coleice]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.portcullis - gate consisting of an iron or wooden grating that hangs in the entry to a castle or fortified townportcullis - gate consisting of an iron or wooden grating that hangs in the entry to a castle or fortified town; can be lowered to prevent passage
gate - a movable barrier in a fence or wall
Translations

portcullis

[pɔːtˈkʌlɪs] Nrastrillo m

portcullis

[pɔːrtˈkʌlɪs] nherse f

portcullis

nFallgitter nt, → Fallgatter nt

portcullis

[pɔːtˈkʌlɪs] nsaracinesca
References in classic literature ?
Celluloid teeth, nine dollars a set, as like as not -- the loose-fit kind, that go up and down like a portcullis when you eat, and fall out when you laugh.
They dismounted at a hostelry which Don Quixote recognised as such and did not take to be a castle with moat, turrets, portcullis, and drawbridge; for ever since he had been vanquished he talked more rationally about everything, as will be shown presently.
Then the porter raised some difficulties, but the Count of Monte Cristo produced a permit from the governor of Rome, allowing him to leave or enter the city at any hour of the day or night; the portcullis was therefore raised, the porter had a louis for his trouble, and they went on their way.
The Count Luigi raised money, like the rest, and one mild September morning, armed with battle-ax, portcullis and thundering culverin, he rode through the greaves and bucklers of his donjon-keep with as gallant a troop of Christian bandits as ever stepped in Italy.
To the right of the Tournelles, that truss of enormous towers, black as ink, running into each other and tied, as it were, by a circular moat; that donjon keep, much more pierced with loopholes than with windows; that drawbridge, always raised; that portcullis, always lowered,--is the Bastille.
The king was conducted to the castle with great pomp, and Fouquet saw him dismount under the portcullis, and say something in the ear of D'Artagnan, who held his stirrup.
Some thirty minutes later five hundred iron clad horses carried their mailed riders beneath the portcullis of the grim pile, and Norman the Devil, riding at their head, spurred rapidly in the direction of the castle of Peter of Colfax.
Shandy returned to his master with the reply, and together Norman of Torn and Bertrade de Montfort clattered across the drawbridge beneath the portcullis of the castle of the Earl of Leicester, brother-in-law of Henry III of England.
Young man," quoth Sir Nigel, sternly, "if you are of the same way of thought as your brother, you may not pass under portcullis of mine.
The Portcullis Systems Secure Remote Access Gateway appliances enable customers to eliminate client-based VPN access by creating secure portals as the external interface to their internal networks.
Portcullis Computer Security, information security specialist, has worked towards supporting CREST, the not-for-profit organisation which represents and certifies the technical information security industry, Bank of England, and Her Majesty s Treasury and Financial Conduct Authority in developing the new CBEST penetration testing standard.
Labour heavyweight Charles Clarke did a little jig for me in Westminster's Portcullis coffee bar to prove that he no longer hates the Prime Minister.