portent


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por·tent

 (pôr′tĕnt′)
n.
1. An indication of something important or calamitous about to occur; an omen.
2. Prophetic or threatening significance: signs full of portent.
3. Archaic Something amazing or marvelous; a prodigy.

[Latin portentum, from neuter past participle of portendere, to portend; see portend.]

portent

(ˈpɔːtɛnt)
n
1. a sign or indication of a future event, esp a momentous or calamitous one; omen
2. momentous or ominous significance: a cry of dire portent.
3. a miraculous occurrence; marvel
[C16: from Latin portentum sign, omen, from portendere to portend]

por•tent

(ˈpɔr tɛnt, ˈpoʊr-)

n.
1. an indication or omen of something about to happen, esp. something momentous.
2. threatening or disquieting significance: an occurrence of dire portent.
3. a prodigy or marvel.
[1555–65; < Latin portentum]
syn: See sign.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.portent - a sign of something about to happenportent - a sign of something about to happen; "he looked for an omen before going into battle"
augury, foretoken, preindication, sign - an event that is experienced as indicating important things to come; "he hoped it was an augury"; "it was a sign from God"
auspice - a favorable omen
foreboding - an unfavorable omen
death knell - an omen of death or destruction

portent

portent

noun
A phenomenon that serves as a sign or warning of some future good or evil:
Idiom: writing on the wall.
Translations
نَذيرُ شُؤْم
předzvěstzlé znamení
varsel
fyrirboîi
ženklas
pareģojumszīme
alâmetbelirti

portent

[ˈpɔːtent] N
1. (= omen) → augurio m, presagio m
a portent of doomun presagio de la catástrofe
2. (= prodigy) → portento m

portent

[ˈpɔːrtɛnt] nprésage m

portent

nZeichen nt, → Omen nt (geh)(of für); a matter of great portent for us alleine Angelegenheit (von) großer Tragweite für uns alle; a portent of things to comeein Vorgeschmack mauf das, was noch bevorsteht; to be a portent of somethingetw ahnen lassen

portent

[ˈpɔːtɛnt] npresagio

portent

(ˈpoːtent) noun
something usually strange and remarkable that warns of some future happening. strange signs and portents.
References in classic literature ?
But did your reverence hear of the portent that was seen last night?
In every Circular or Polygonal household it has been a habit from time immemorial -- and now has become a kind of instinct among the women of our higher classes -- that the mothers and daughters should constantly keep their eyes and mouths towards their husband and his male friends; and for a lady in a family of distinction to turn her back upon her husband would be regarded as a kind of portent, involving loss of STATUS.
Well; twice or thrice has she passed before his sight, each time with a heavier step, a paler cheek, and more anxious brow; and in the third week of his non-appearance he detects a portent of evil entering the house, in the guise of an apothecary.
Seeing, then, that such a fearful portent had broken in upon our hecatombs, Calchas forthwith declared to us the oracles of heaven.
Brydon breathed his wonder till the very impunity of his attitude and the very insistence of his eyes produced, as he felt, a sudden stir which showed the next instant as a deeper portent, while the head raised itself, the betrayal of a braver purpose.
And as if he had done all else, he turned to Miss Bartlett, who sat like some portent against the skies of the evening.
And, if his portent proves correct, we come back feeling still more angry against him, and with a vague notion that, somehow or other, he has had something to do with it.
So utterly inexplicable and uncanny had the entire occurrence been that there was not a one of them who could find a ray of comfort penetrating the dead blackness of its ominous portent.
He spoke in French that the cook might not understand the sinister portent of his words.
It writhed away from the mast, and for a moment overhung the captain like some threatening portent.
Valeria," said Benjamin, pointing to the Portent in the chair.
But at this very time two serpents appeared and destroyed Laocoon and one of his two sons, a portent which so alarmed the followers of Aeneas that they withdrew to Ida.