porter


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

por·ter 1

 (pôr′tər)
n.
1. A person employed to carry burdens, especially an attendant who carries travelers' baggage at a hotel or transportation station.
2. A railroad employee who waits on passengers in a sleeping car or parlor car.
3. A maintenance worker for a building or institution.

[Middle English portour, from Anglo-Norman, from Late Latin portātor, from Latin portāre, to carry; see per- in Indo-European roots.]

por·ter 2

 (pôr′tər)
n. Chiefly British
One in charge of a gate or door.

[Middle English, from Anglo-Norman, from Late Latin portārius, from Latin porta, gate; see per- in Indo-European roots.]

por·ter 3

 (pôr′tər)
n.
A dark beer resembling light stout, made from malt browned or charred by drying at a high temperature.

[Short for porter's ale (probably so called because it was favored by laborers in the 1700s).]

porter

(ˈpɔːtə)
n
1. a person employed to carry luggage, parcels, supplies, etc, esp at a railway station or hotel
2. (in hospitals) a person employed to move patients from place to place
3. (Railways) US and Canadian a railway employee who waits on passengers, esp in a sleeper
4. E African a manual labourer
[C14: from Old French portour, from Late Latin portātōr, from Latin portāre to carry]

porter

(ˈpɔːtə)
n
1. chiefly Brit a person in charge of a gate or door; doorman or gatekeeper
2. a person employed by a university or college as a caretaker and doorkeeper who also answers enquiries
3. a person in charge of the maintenance of a building, esp a block of flats
4. (Roman Catholic Church) RC Church Also called: ostiary a person ordained to what was formerly the lowest in rank of the minor orders
[C13: from Old French portier, from Late Latin portārius doorkeeper, from Latin porta door]

porter

(ˈpɔːtə)
n
(Brewing) Brit a dark sweet ale brewed from black malt
[C18: shortened from porter's ale, apparently because it was a favourite beverage of porters]

Porter

(ˈpɔːtə)
n
1. (Biography) Cole. 1893–1964, US composer and lyricist of musical comedies. His most popular songs include Night and Day and Let's do It
2. (Biography) George, Baron Porter of Luddenham. 1920–2002, British chemist, who shared a Nobel prize for chemistry in 1967 for his work on flash photolysis
3. (Biography) Katherine Anne. 1890–1980, US short-story writer and novelist. Her best-known collections of stories are Flowering Judas (1930) and Pale Horse, Pale Rider (1939)
4. (Biography) Peter. 1929–2010, Australian poet, lived in Britain
5. (Biography) Rodney Robert. 1917–85, British biochemist: shared the Nobel prize for physiology or medicine 1972 for determining the structure of an antibody
6. (Biography) William Sidney. original name of O. Henry

por•ter1

(ˈpɔr tər, ˈpoʊr-)

n.
1. a person hired to carry packages or baggage, as at a railroad station or a hotel.
2. a person who does cleaning and maintenance work in a building, factory, store, etc.
3. an attendant in a railroad parlor car or sleeping car.
[1350–1400; Middle English, variant of portour < Middle French porteour < Late Latin portātōrem, acc. of portātor. See port5, -or2]

por•ter2

(ˈpɔr tər, ˈpoʊr-)

n.
a person who has charge of a door or gate; doorkeeper.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Anglo-French < Late Latin portārius gatekeeper]

por•ter3

(ˈpɔr tər, ˈpoʊr-)

n.
a heavy, dark brown ale made with malt browned by drying at a high temperature.
[1720–30; short for porter's ale, appar. orig. brewed for porters]

Por•ter

(ˈpɔr tər, ˈpoʊr-)

n.
1. Cole, 1893–1964, U.S. composer.
2. Sir George, born 1920, British chemist: Nobel prize 1967.
3. Katherine Anne, 1890–1980, U.S. novelist and short-story writer.
4. Rodney Robert, 1917–85, British biochemist: Nobel prize for physiology or medicine 1972.
5. William Sydney ( “O. Henry” ), 1862–1910, U.S. short-story writer.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.porter - a person employed to carry luggage and suppliesporter - a person employed to carry luggage and supplies
laborer, labourer, manual laborer, jack - someone who works with their hands; someone engaged in manual labor
redcap - a porter who helps passengers with their baggage at a railroad station
skycap - a porter who helps passengers with their baggage at an airport
2.porter - someone who guards an entranceporter - someone who guards an entrance  
commissionaire - a uniformed doorman
guard - a person who keeps watch over something or someone
night porter - a porter on duty during the night
ticket collector, ticket taker - someone who is paid to admit only those who have purchased tickets
3.Porter - United States writer of novels and short stories (1890-1980)
4.Porter - United States composer and lyricist of musical comedies (1891-1946)
5.porter - United States writer of short stories whose pen name was O. Henry (1862-1910)Porter - United States writer of short stories whose pen name was O. Henry (1862-1910)
6.porter - a railroad employee who assists passengers (especially on sleeping cars)
employee - a worker who is hired to perform a job
7.porter - a very dark sweet ale brewed from roasted unmalted barley
ale - a general name for beer made with a top fermenting yeast; in some of the United States an ale is (by law) a brew of more than 4% alcohol by volume
Verb1.porter - carry luggage or supplies; "They portered the food up Mount Kilimanjaro for the tourists"
carry, transport - move while supporting, either in a vehicle or in one's hands or on one's body; "You must carry your camping gear"; "carry the suitcases to the car"; "This train is carrying nuclear waste"; "These pipes carry waste water into the river"

porter

1
noun (Chiefly Brit.) doorman, caretaker, janitor, concierge, gatekeeper a porter at the block of flats

porter

2
noun baggage attendant, carrier, bearer, baggage-carrier A porter slammed the baggage compartment doors.
Translations
بَوّاب، حَمّالحارِس ، بوّابشَيَّالعَتّال
nosičvrátný
bærerdørvogterdragerportnerportør
kantaja
nosačnosačica
hordárteherhordó
burîarmaîurdyravörîur
ポーター
포터
nešikas
nesējsšveicars
nosačvratar
vaktmästare
พนักงานยกกระเป๋า
hamalkapıcıyük taşıyıcı
người khuân vác

porter

[ˈpɔːtəʳ]
A. N
1. (Rail, Aer) → maletero m, mozo m de cuerda or de estación, changador m (S. Cone) (US) (Rail) → mozo m de los coches-cama, camarero m (LAm); (touting for custom) → mozo m de cuerda
2. (Brit) [of hotel, office etc] → portero/a m/f
3. (= Sherpa) → porteador m
4. (in hospital) → camillero/a m/f
5. (o.f.) (= beer) → cerveza f negra
B. CPD porter's lodge Nportería f, conserjería f

porter

[ˈpɔːrr] n
(for luggage)porteur m
(block of flats)gardien(ne) m/f; (in hotel, public building)portier mporter's lodge nloge f du gardien (or de la gardienne)

porter

1
n (of office etc)Pförtner(in) m(f), → Portier m, → Portiersfrau f; (= hospital porter)Assistent(in) m(f); (at hotel) → Portier m, → Portiersfrau f; (Rail, at airport) → Gepäckträger(in) m(f); (= Sherpa etc)(Lasten)träger(in) m(f); (US Rail) → Schlafwagenschaffner(in) m(f); porter’s lodgePförtnerloge f

porter

2
n (= beer)Porter m or nt

porter

[ˈpɔːtəʳ] n (of office) → portinaio/a, portiere/a; (of hotel) → portiere/a (Rail, Aer) → facchino, portabagagli m inv (Am) (Rail) → addetto ai vagoni letto

porter

(ˈpoːtə) noun
1. a person whose job is to carry luggage in a railway station etc. The old lady could not find a porter to carry her suitcase from the train.
2. a person whose job is to carry things eg in rough country where there is no other form of transport. He set off into the jungle with three porters.
3. a doorman or attendant in a hotel etc. a hospital porter.

porter

شَيَّال nosič portner Portier αχθοφόρος mozo kantaja portier nosač facchino ポーター 포터 kruier portner portier carregador носильщик vaktmästare พนักงานยกกระเป๋า hamal người khuân vác 守门人
References in classic literature ?
said Seryozha, coming back rosy and good- humored from his walk the day before his birthday, and giving his overcoat to the tall old hall porter, who smiled down at the little person from the height of his long figure.
The minute the chief secretary came out, I announced him," said the hall porter with a good-humored wink.
In the reign of the Caliph Haroun-al-Raschid, there lived at Bagdad a porter who, in spite of his humble calling, was an intelligent and sensible man.
The old man, who seemed to understand what she wanted, vanished into the house, and returned bringing a large jar of wine, which the porter placed in his basket.
Porter, his hands clasped beneath the tails of his long coat, paces back and forth under the ever-watchful eye of his faithful secretary, Mr.
Jane Porter, the professor's daughter, is in strained and lifeless conversation with William Cecil Clayton and Tarzan of the Apes.
Eugenie concealed Louise in an angle of the gateway, so that if the porter chanced to awake he might see but one person.
The porter got up as Eugenie expected, and even advanced some steps to recognize the person who was going out, but seeing a young man striking his boot impatiently with his riding-whip, he opened it immediately.
And upon growing more pressing the porter said, "he had positive orders to let no person in; but if you think proper," said he, "to leave your name, I will acquaint his lordship; and if you call another time you shall know when he will see you.
Upon which the porter, with no very agreeable voice or aspect, affirmed, "that there was no young lady in that house, and consequently none could he see;" adding, "sure you are the strangest man I ever met with, for you will not take an answer.
I do not know, Miss Porter," replied the young man, "unless we have discovered a runaway simian from the London Zoo who has brought back a European education to his jungle home.
The door was locked, and when they came back with the porter it was open.