porthole

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port·hole

 (pôrt′hōl′)
n.
1. Nautical A small, usually circular window in a ship's side.
2. An opening in a fortified wall; an embrasure.

porthole

(ˈpɔːtˌhəʊl)
n
1. (Nautical Terms) a small aperture in the side of a vessel to admit light and air, usually fitted with a watertight glass or metal cover, or both. Sometimes shortened to: port
2. (Fortifications) an opening in a wall or parapet through which a gun can be fired; embrasure

port•hole

(ˈpɔrtˌhoʊl, ˈpoʊrt-)

n.
1. a round, windowlike opening with a hinged, watertight glass cover in the side of a vessel for admitting air and light. Compare port 4 (def. 1).
2. an opening in a wall, door, etc., as one through which to shoot.
[1585–95]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.porthole - a window in a ship or airplaneporthole - a window in a ship or airplane  
deadlight - a strong shutter over a ship's porthole that is closed in stormy weather
fuselage - the central body of an airplane that is designed to accommodate the crew and passengers (or cargo)
ship - a vessel that carries passengers or freight
window - a framework of wood or metal that contains a glass windowpane and is built into a wall or roof to admit light or air
2.porthole - an opening (in a wall or ship or armored vehicle) for firing throughporthole - an opening (in a wall or ship or armored vehicle) for firing through
opening - a vacant or unobstructed space that is man-made; "they left a small opening for the cat at the bottom of the door"
ship - a vessel that carries passengers or freight
Translations
كُوَّةٌ جانِبِيَّه
okénko
koøje
kajütablakkerek hajóablak
kÿrauga
iliuminatoriusliukas
iluminatorslūka
okienko
ladijska lina
gemi penceresilumbar

porthole

[ˈpɔːthəʊl] Nportilla f

porthole

[ˈpɔːrthəʊl] nhublot m

porthole

nBullauge nt

porthole

[ˈpɔːtˌhəʊl] noblò m inv

porthole

(ˈpoːthəul) noun
a small, usually round, window in a ship.
References in classic literature ?
These galleries are like spacious railway tunnels, and at short intervals in them great guns frown out upon sea and town through portholes five or six hundred feet above the ocean.
He disappeared rather in a panic during a two-days' gale, in which he had the portholes of his cabin battened down, and remained in his cot reading the Washerwoman of Finchley Common, left on board the Ramchunder by the Right Honourable the Lady Emily Hornblower, wife of the Rev.
Aye, aye, cried Queequeg, and seizing the carpenter's heavy hatchet, he leaned out of a porthole, and steel to iron, began slashing at the largest fluke-chains.
Matkah taught him to follow the cod and the halibut along the under-sea banks and wrench the rockling out of his hole among the weeds; how to skirt the wrecks lying a hundred fathoms below water and dart like a rifle bullet in at one porthole and out at another as the fishes ran; how to dance on the top of the waves when the lightning was racing all over the sky, and wave his flipper politely to the stumpy-tailed Albatross and the Man-of-war Hawk as they went down the wind; how to jump three or four feet clear of the water like a dolphin, flippers close to the side and tail curved; to leave the flying fish alone because they are all bony; to take the shoulder-piece out of a cod at full speed ten fathoms deep, and never to stop and look at a boat or a ship, but particularly a row-boat.
His whisper was getting fainter and fainter, and all the time he stared straight out through the porthole, in which there was not even a star to be seen.
Captain Hodgson opens the great colloid underbody porthole through which I watch over-lighted London slide eastward as the gale gets hold of us.
When we had entered the compartment we had seated ourselves upon a low bench beneath the porthole.
For Bert Smallways all this was framed in the frame of the open porthole.
There was not a porthole on the grimy glass of which you might not have written with your finger "Dirty pig"; and she had already written it on several.
Michael left the Makambo as he had come on board, through a porthole.
Immediately the outer plate fell back upon its hinges like a porthole, and the lenticular glass which closed the scuttle appeared.
The inner door, a grating, was shut and bolted, and curtained like the open porthole.