portmanteau

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port·man·teau

 (pôrt-măn′tō, pôrt′măn-tō′)
n. pl. port·man·teaus or port·man·teaux (-tōz, -tōz′)
1. A large leather suitcase that opens into two hinged compartments.
2.
a. A word formed by merging the sounds and meanings of two different words, as chortle, from chuckle and snort. Also called portmanteau word.
b. A word or part of a word that is analyzable as consisting of more than one morpheme without a clear boundary between them, as French du "of the" from de "of" and le "the." Also called portmanteau morph.
adj.
General or generalized: a portmanteau description; portmanteau terms.

[French portemanteau : porte-, from porter, to carry (from Old French; see port5) + manteau, cloak (from Old French mantel, from Latin mantellum). N., senses 2a and b, in reference to Lewis Carroll's Through the Looking-Glass, in which Humpty Dumpty explains slithy and other made-up words in the poem "Jabberwocky" to Alice as follows: "Slithy" means "lithe and slimy" ... You see it's like a portmanteau—there are two meanings packed up into one word.]

portmanteau

(pɔːtˈmæntəʊ)
n, pl -teaus or -teaux (-təʊz)
1. (formerly) a large travelling case made of stiff leather, esp one hinged at the back so as to open out into two compartments
2. (modifier) embodying several uses or qualities: the heroine is a portmanteau figure of all the virtues. Also called: portmantle
[C16: from French: cloak carrier, from porter to carry + manteau cloak, mantle]

port•man•teau

(pɔrtˈmæn toʊ, poʊrt-; ˌpɔrt mænˈtoʊ, ˌpoʊrt-)

n., pl. -teaus, -teaux (-toʊz, -toʊ; -ˈtoʊz, -ˈtoʊ)
adj. n.
1. Chiefly Brit. a case or bag to carry clothing in while traveling, esp. a leather trunk or suitcase that opens into two halves.
adj.
2. combining or blending several items, features, or qualities: a portmanteau show.
[1575–85; < French portemanteau literally, (it) carries (the) cloak; see port5, mantle]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.portmanteau - a new word formed by joining two others and combining their meanings; "`smog' is a blend of `smoke' and `fog'"; "`motel' is a portmanteau word made by combining `motor' and `hotel'"; "`brunch' is a well-known portmanteau"
motel - a motor hotel
neologism, neology, coinage - a newly invented word or phrase
brunch - combination breakfast and lunch; usually served in late morning
shopaholic - a compulsive shopper; "shopaholics can never resist a bargain"
workaholic - person with a compulsive need to work
smog, smogginess - air pollution by a mixture of smoke and fog
dandle - move (a baby) up and down in one's arms or on one's knees
2.portmanteau - a large travelling bag made of stiff leatherportmanteau - a large travelling bag made of stiff leather
suitcase, traveling bag, travelling bag, grip, bag - a portable rectangular container for carrying clothes; "he carried his small bag onto the plane with him"
Translations
حقيبة سفر
голямкоженкуфар
چمدان
matkalaukku
waliza
va li

portmanteau

[pɔːtˈmæntəʊ]
A. N (portmanteaus, portmanteaux (pl)) [pɔːtˈmæntəʊz]baúl m de viaje
B. CPD portmanteau word Npalabra f combinada

portmanteau

n pl <-s or -x> → Handkoffer m

portmanteau

[ˌpɔːtˈmæntəʊ] nbaule m portabiti
References in periodicals archive ?
Bromance and bro hug seem to be the two most popular bro portmanteaux, maybe because of the way they challenge some norms in American, or more specifically WASP (White Anglo Saxon Protestant) society, where close same-sex relationships create anxieties because of a long tradition of homophobia, or a fear of homosexuality.
Meanwhile, the word man seems to be spinning off its own portmanteaux.
This paper reviews a number of portmanteaux in current use and considers their place in Chinese grammatology.
In terms of their structure and their relationship to oral words, portmanteaux embody a conception different from most mainstream characters.
I should also like to know how it is that, in the United States, one can carry on a reasonably sized handbag (not a large portmanteaux that is currently fashionable), yet here, in the good old UK, you have to squeeze your handbag, together with any book you are taking, into the hand luggage.
However I think it would be difficult to show that the portmanteaux in the Cosmogonie undermine the stability of the whole text's meaning, as Attridge argues convincingly with respect to Finnegans Wake.
As in A Clockwork Orange, Topol's "accelerated city-speak" employs countless neologisms and portmanteaux to dazzle readers and depict a uniquely unfamiliar environment.
Sample portmanteaux, and their definitions, that will be utilized in the CIT campaign include: