portraiture

(redirected from portraitures)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

por·trai·ture

 (pôr′trĭ-cho͝or′)
n.
1. The art or practice of making portraits.
2. A portrait.
3. Portraits considered as a group.

portraiture

(ˈpɔːtrɪtʃə)
n
1. (Art Terms) the practice or art of making portraits
2. (Art Terms)
a. another term for portrait1
b. portraits collectively
3. a verbal description

por•trai•ture

(ˈpɔr trɪ tʃər, ˈpoʊr-)

n.
1. the art or practice of making portraits.
2. a pictorial representation; portrait.
3. a verbal picture.

portraiture

1. the process or art of painting portraits.
2. the portrait itself.
3. portraits collectively.
See also: Art
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.portraiture - a word picture of a person's appearance and character
characterisation, characterization, delineation, depiction, word picture, word-painting, picture - a graphic or vivid verbal description; "too often the narrative was interrupted by long word pictures"; "the author gives a depressing picture of life in Poland"; "the pamphlet contained brief characterizations of famous Vermonters"
2.portraiture - the activity of making portraits
delineation, depiction, portrayal - representation by drawing or painting etc
Translations

portraiture

[ˈpɔːtrɪtʃəʳ] N (= portrait) → retrato m; (= portraits collectively) → retratos mpl; (= art of portraiture) → arte m de retratar
Spanish portraiture in the 16th centuryretratos mpl españoles del siglo XVI

portraiture

n (= portrait)Porträt nt; (= portraits collectively)Porträts pl; (= art of portraiture) (painting) → Porträtmalerei f; (Phot) → Porträtfotografie f

portraiture

[ˈpɔːtrɪtʃəʳ] n (Art) → ritrattistica
References in classic literature ?
These colors had now assumed, and were momentarily assuming, a startling and most intense brilliancy, that gave to the spectral and fiendish portraitures an aspect that might have thrilled even firmer nerves than my own.
A further proof is, that novices in the art attain to finish: of diction and precision of portraiture before they can construct the plot.
But Doctor Byles, and other gentlemen who had long been familiar with the successive rulers of the province, were heard to whisper the names of Shirley, of Pownall, of Sir Francis Bernard, and of the well-remembered Hutchinson; thereby confessing that the actors, whoever they might be, in this spectral march of governors, had succeeded in putting on some distant portraiture of the real personages.
The fur trade itself, which has given life to all this portraiture, is essentially evanescent.