nystagmus

(redirected from positional nystagmus)
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Related to positional nystagmus: rotary nystagmus, spontaneous nystagmus

nys·tag·mus

 (nĭ-stăg′məs)
n.
A rapid, involuntary, oscillatory motion of the eyeball.

[New Latin, from Greek nustagmos, drowsiness.]

nys·tag′mic (-mĭk) adj.

nystagmus

(nɪˈstæɡməs)
n
(Medicine) involuntary movement of the eye comprising a smooth drift followed by a flick back, occurring in several situations, for example after the body has been rotated or in disorders of the cerebellum
[C19: New Latin, from Greek nustagmos]

nys•tag•mus

(nɪˈstæg məs)

n.
a persistent, rapid, involuntary side-to-side eye movement.
[1815–25; < New Latin < Greek nystagmós nodding, derivative of nystázein to nod]
nys•tag′mic, adj.

nystagmus

uncontrollable and rapid movement of the eyeball in any direction. — nystagmic, adj.
See also: Eyes
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nystagmus - involuntary movements of the eyeballs; its presence or absence is used to diagnose a variety of neurological and visual disorders
eye movement - the movement of the eyes
physiological nystagmus - small involuntary tremors of the eyeballs; when it is eliminated by stabilizing the image on the retina, visual perception fades rapidly from fatigue of the retinal receptors
rotational nystagmus - nystagmus caused by the body rotating rapidly; large slow movements of the eyeballs are in the direction of rotation
post-rotational nystagmus - nystagmus caused by suddenly stopping the rapid rotation of the body; large slow movements of the eyeballs are in the direction opposite to the direction of rotation
Translations
nystagmus

nys·tag·mus

n. nistagmo, espasmo involuntario del globo ocular;
palatal ______ palatal.

nystagmus

n nistagmo
References in periodicals archive ?
The investigated parameters included spontaneous nystagmus, head-shaking nystagmus, positional nystagmus during the Dix-Hallpike and head-roll maneuvers, nystagmus with the Valsalva maneuver, the Tullio phenomenon after hyperventilation and exposure to 3 kHz at 110 dB, and eye movements after mastoid vibration at 100 Hz.
It is a reliable test in the diagnosis of BPPV when a paroxysmal positional nystagmus is produced (Norre 1995).
Electronystagmography found no spontaneous or positional nystagmus.