positivism

(redirected from positivistically)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

pos·i·tiv·ism

 (pŏz′ĭ-tĭ-vĭz′əm)
n.
1. Philosophy
a. A doctrine contending that sense perceptions are the only admissible basis of human knowledge and precise thought.
b. The application of this doctrine in logic, epistemology, and ethics.
c. The system of Auguste Comte designed to supersede theology and metaphysics and depending on a hierarchy of the sciences, beginning with mathematics and culminating in sociology.
d. Any of several doctrines or viewpoints, often similar to Comte's, that stress attention to actual practice over consideration of what is ideal: "Positivism became the 'scientific' base for authoritarian politics, especially in Mexico and Brazil" (Raymond Carr).
2. The state or quality of being positive.

pos′i·tiv·ist, pos′i·tiv·is′tic adj.
pos′i·tiv·ist n.

positivism

(ˈpɒzɪtɪˌvɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy) a strong form of empiricism, esp as established in the philosophical system of Auguste Comte, that rejects metaphysics and theology as seeking knowledge beyond the scope of experience, and holds that experimental investigation and observation are the only sources of substantial knowledge. See also logical positivism
2. (Law) Also called: legal positivism the jurisprudential doctrine that the legitimacy of a law depends on its being enacted in proper form, rather than on its content. Compare natural law3
3. the quality of being definite, certain, etc
ˈpositivist n, adj
ˌpositivˈistic adj
ˌpositivˈistically adv

pos•i•tiv•ism

(ˈpɒz ɪ təˌvɪz əm)

n.
1. the state or quality of being positive.
2. a philosophical system concerned with positive facts and phenomena, and excluding speculation upon ultimate causes or origins.
[1850–55]
pos′i•tiv•ist, adj., n.
pos`i•tiv•is′tic, adj.

positivism

1. a philosophical system developed by Auguste Comte, concerned with positive facts and phenomena, the flrst verifled by the methods of the empirical sciences, the second explainable by scientific laws. Also called Comtism.
2. a contemporary philosophical movement stressing the task of philosophy as criticizing and analyzing science, and rejecting all transcendental metaphysics. Also called logical positivism. — positivist, n.positivistic, adj.
See also: Philosophy

positivism

A philosophical doctrine that we can only have knowledge of things we experience through the senses.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.positivism - the form of empiricism that bases all knowledge on perceptual experience (not on intuition or revelation)
empiricism, empiricist philosophy, sensationalism - (philosophy) the doctrine that knowledge derives from experience
Comtism - Auguste Comte's positivistic philosophy that metaphysics and theology should be replaced by a hierarchy of sciences from mathematics at the base to sociology at the top
2.positivism - a quality or state characterized by certainty or acceptance or affirmation and dogmatic assertiveness
quality - an essential and distinguishing attribute of something or someone; "the quality of mercy is not strained"--Shakespeare
assertiveness, self-assertiveness - aggressive self-assurance; given to making bold assertions
Translations

positivism

[ˈpɒzɪtɪvɪzəm] Npositivismo m

positivism

[ˈpɒzɪtɪvɪzəm] npositivisme m

positivism

nPositivismus m

positivism

[ˈpɒzɪtɪvɪzm] npositivismo
References in periodicals archive ?
As this brief sketch indicates, we cannot narrowly or positivistically delimit De Quincey's encounters with Hogarth's serpentine line or the range of its associations.
Under conditions of monopoly capitalism, commodification has become a totalizing condition: all objects, all products, even people and their ideas and feelings become objectified and ossified and also rationally and positivistically quantifiable and standardized, reduced to the logic of the cash nexus and the balance sheet.
The production of a statistically knowable population, an object assumed to be positivistically available and objectively knowable through statistical reduction and prediction, is not new, but the media powers to circulate the image of an "empirical population carved up exactly into its parts" are arguably unprecedented (Ranciere 105).