posology


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po·sol·o·gy

 (pə-sŏl′ə-jē, pō-)
n.
The study of the dosages of medications.

[Greek posos, what quantity + -logy.]

posology

(pəˈsɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Medicine) the branch of medicine concerned with the determination of appropriate doses of drugs or agents
[C19: from French posologie, from Greek posos how much]
posological adj

po•sol•o•gy

(pəˈsɒl ə dʒi, poʊ-)

n.
the branch of pharmacology dealing with the determination of dosage.
[1805–15; < Greek póso(s) how much + -logy]
pos•o•log•ic (ˌpɒs əˈlɒdʒ ɪk) pos`o•log′i•cal, adj.

posology

1. the science of medicinal dosage.
2. a system of dosage. — posologic, posological, adj.
See also: Medical Specialties
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.posology - the pharmacological determination of appropriate doses of drugs and medicines
materia medica, pharmacological medicine, pharmacology - the science or study of drugs: their preparation and properties and uses and effects
References in periodicals archive ?
The prescriber guide and a full list of contraindications, warnings and information on posology can be found in the edoxaban summary of product characteristics at https://www.
Posology (dosage): 20 ml mixed in a glass of apple juice or carrot/beetroot juice 3 times per day.
Acute treatment protocols in potential re-hospitalizations: (Name, posology, day):
For the other half, you really need to get the Posology oh so just right for our very precious Goldilocks' patients.
Within this, naturopathic case taking is covered and provides an outline of the philosophy and principles of practice, holistic consultation, structure and technique of case taking (initial, follow up and complex cases), posology (dosing), and how to determine a prognosis for recovery.
Albuquerque and Andrade (2002) remark that the knowledge about the combination between scientific and popular wisdoms generates the knowledge and assimilation of preparation techniques, which may favor the bases for future posology planning.
Given its good safety profile, with no or minimal side effects (including mitochondrial toxicity), convenient posology (one pill, once daily) and minimal side effects, ETV was initially considered the drug of choice for treating hepatitis B in HIV patients who did not require antiretroviral therapy.