post chaise


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post chaise

n.
A closed, four-wheeled, horse-drawn carriage, formerly used to transport mail and passengers.

post chaise

n
a closed four-wheeled horse-drawn coach used as a rapid means for transporting mail and passengers in the 18th and 19th centuries
[C18: from post3 + chaise]

post′ chaise′


n.
a four-wheeled coach for rapid transportation of passengers and mail, used in the 18th and early 19th centuries.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.post chaise - closed horse-drawn carriage with four wheelspost chaise - closed horse-drawn carriage with four wheels; formerly used to transport passengers and mail
carriage, equipage, rig - a vehicle with wheels drawn by one or more horses
Translations
postivaunu
References in classic literature ?
Reviewing his impressions of the recent battle, picturing pleasantly to himself the impression his news of a victory would create, or recalling the send-off given him by the commander in chief and his fellow officers, Prince Andrew was galloping along in a post chaise enjoying the feelings of a man who has at length begun to attain a long-desired happiness.
At the grand opening ceremony on September 26, Mr R Ferrand drove to the centre of the bridge in a Post Chaise and drank a toast saying: "May the Almighty protect this undertaking, may this bridge stand the test of ages till time is no more.
Hoffmann used to explain the wealth of imaginative figures that offered themselves to him for his stories by the quickly changing pictures and impressions he had received during a journey of some weeks in a post chaise, while still a babe at his mother's breast.
Love God and do what you please," says Augustine, following up a lofty imperative with an elusive one, and Johnson boldly responds by saying, in effect, if God would release me from certain obligations and from the nagging consciousness of time, this is what I'd be most pleased to do: I would spend my days driving briskly in a post chaise with a pretty woman.
In the epilogue, composed as a letter to the reader, the author himself offers three explanations of his novel: he defines his work as "classical" (a fairy tale), as baroque (a danse macabre), and as romantic (a post chaise, with the author as coachman).