post-Fordism


Also found in: Wikipedia.

post-Fordism

(ˌpəʊstˈfɔːdɪzəm)
n
(Commerce) the idea that modern industrial production has moved away from mass production in huge factories, as pioneered by Henry Ford, towards specialized markets based on small flexible manufacturing units
ˌpost-ˈFordist adj
References in periodicals archive ?
Post-Fordism, Precarity, and the Labor of Art: 'The art field is a space of wild contradiction and phenomenal exploitation.
On the left it was the sociologists, geographers and the new discipline of cultural studies, being developed by people like Stuart Hall, who were writing about the growing rust belt in the US--the decline of heavy industry and its relocation to the 'Asian Tigers'--and about the rise of flexible specialisation and post-Fordism within the advanced capitalist economies.
Galloway in a widely read but dreadful 2013 Critical Inquiry article entitled "The Poverty of Philosophy: Realism and Post-Fordism.
This revelation resonates diachronically as well, as Breu suggests that the base-superstructure dynamic also organizes the relationship between early twentieth-century Fordism and late twentieth-century post-Fordism.
Conversely, it is easy to see how the logics of 'control' and 'security' can be understood as informing the characteristic tendencies of post-Fordism, as governments have sought to replace direct centralised control of corporations and economic sectors, and direct provision of services, with far more complex networks of regulation and semi-private provision, while corporations have increasingly focused on the complex mapping, differentiation and anticipation of consumer behaviour over any clumsy attempts at market homogenisation or didactic marketing.
The process of abstraction that post-Fordism uses to reproduce itself tends to bring forward a hyper-idealist understanding of our life-world.
Chapters that summarize and synthesize the sociology of work literature are presented on the following topics: the historical transformation of work; work and alienation; work and deskilling; work, upskilling, and polarization of skill; fordism, neo-fordism, and post-fordism in industrial and service work; non-standard work; unemployment; domestic work; and work and globalization.
The publication, early in 2013, in Critical Inquiry of Alex Galloway's article, 'The Poverty of Philosophy: Realism and Post-Fordism,' set off a mid-sized online kerfuffle, and provides us with a suitable example of the second of the two lines of inquiry mentioned above--challenges to SR in the form of questions of politics and ideology.
In post-Fordism, the labor of Fordist regime has to be changed, for example, and the Smithian division of labor has to be reexamined.
By acknowledging such countervailing trends, and briefly situating his arguments in relation to the seemingly contradictory claims embedded in extant debates over post-Fordism, postindustrialism, postmodernity and so on, Ritzer on occasion pulls back from an overly grandiose and totalizing view of McDonaldization's role in the contemporary world, portraying it as merely one influential process among others in a complex and contradictory social field.
Post-Fordism, Precarity and the Labor of Art (2011) published by the New York-based e-flux journal, among them.
But then they take back the seeming definitive statement by saying that globalization and digitization are hard to distinguish from the economic aspects of Post-Fordism because all are mutually influential.
Full browser ?