post-Fordism


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post-Fordism

(ˌpəʊstˈfɔːdɪzəm)
n
(Commerce) the idea that modern industrial production has moved away from mass production in huge factories, as pioneered by Henry Ford, towards specialized markets based on small flexible manufacturing units
ˌpost-ˈFordist adj
References in periodicals archive ?
On post-Fordism as heightened competition, entrepreneurialism, and neo-conservativism, see David Harvey, The Urban Experience 13 (1989).
3) Post-fordism refers to a shift from the predominance of economies driven by manufacturing industries characterized by a mass, relatively homogenous, semi-skilled workforce (Fordism) towards economies dominated by employment in services, associated with a more homogenous, fragmented workforce vis-a-vis post-fordist.
Heffernan, N (2000) Capital, Class & Technology in Contemporary American Culture: Projecting Post-Fordism, London & Sterling: Pluto Press.
Chapters that summarize and synthesize the sociology of work literature are presented on the following topics: the historical transformation of work; work and alienation; work and deskilling; work, upskilling, and polarization of skill; fordism, neo-fordism, and post-fordism in industrial and service work; non-standard work; unemployment; domestic work; and work and globalization.
But then they take back the seeming definitive statement by saying that globalization and digitization are hard to distinguish from the economic aspects of Post-Fordism because all are mutually influential.
Stefano Lucarelli and Andrea Fumagalli believe that post-fordism is only a transition phase from fordist to cognitive capitalism, thus mentioning that, in their opinion, "the phrase CC better captures the links between the exploitation of knowledge and the accumulation of surplus.
The Taming of the Shrew, Hamlet, All's Well that Ends Well, Timon of Athens, Winter's Tale, Tempest: democracy, consent and hospitality, biopower and political theology, economies from the ancient gift to post-Fordism, ecology and curatorial desire, legal theory (Roman and liberal), John Locke and Paulo Virno, St.
To achieve this end, Mah draws on methodologies and previous research by others in the fields of community studies (especially research in 'rust belt' cities), a variety of literature dealing with transitions from industrial to post-industrial, Fordism to post-Fordism, uneven geographical development (particularly capitalist growth and destruction in urban areas) and sociology of landscapes and legacies of the past.
1994) Post-Fordism and the politics of industry development in Australia, Unpublished PhD Thesis, Department of Science and Technology Studies, and Department of History and Politics, University of Wollongong
Such debates, and the social struggles that surrounded them, prefigured wider changes in the prevailing regime of capital accumulation as the postwar "Fordist" settlement went into crisis in the 1970s, yielding to the post-Fordism of the 1980s and 1990s.
The culture of post-Fordism, as many theorists have argued in recent years, aims squarely at our human resources, seeking to exploit not only our bodies but also our affects and desires.
Despite his criticism of the way work, the household sector and well-being have been treated in Gross Domestic Product, and his refutation of the claims of neoclassical and libertarian economists that labour-power have been voluntarily sold, Perelman has not dealt with what has been conceptualised as the transition from Fordism to post-Fordism and has not distinguished between the effects of internal and external labour markets.
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