Post-Impressionism

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Post-Im•pres•sion•ism

(ˌpoʊst ɪmˈprɛʃ əˌnɪz əm)

n.
(sometimes l.c.) a varied development of Impressionism by a group of painters, chiefly between 1880 and 1900, stressing formal structure or the possibilities of form and color.
[1905–10]
Post`-Im•pres′sion•ist, adj., n.
Post`-Im•pres`sion•is′tic, adj.

Post-Impressionism

a late 19th-century reaction to Impressionism, emphasizing on one hand the emotional aspect of painting and on the other a return to formal structure; the first led to Expressionism; the second, to Cubism. — Post-Impressionist, n.
See also: Art

post-impressionism

(c. 1880–1910) A term loosely applied to a diverse group of artists whose paintings developed from Impressionism and who worked in widely divergent styles, e.g. Gauguin and Matisse.
Translations

post-impressionism

[ˈpəʊstɪmˈpreʃənɪzəm] Nposimpresionismo m
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References in periodicals archive ?
The breadth of what our visitors can see is enormous and the display spans over 100 years; from early 20th century French post-impressionists to American post-war video artists there is something for everyone to enjoy for free.
Gallerists like Durand-Ruel and Bernheim-Jeune held exhibitions that sealed the reputation of the Impressionists and Post-Impressionists as the preeminent artists of their time.
Together they were influenced by Cezanne, Renoir and other Impressionists and Post-Impressionists whom they met in Paris from 1910-11.
It provides a range of works and styles by this nature artist, offering powerful works that have among their influences the art of Impressionists, Post-Impressionists, and abstract artists as well.
VAN GOGH AND THE POST-IMPRESSIONISTS FOR KIDS: Their Lives and Ideas, 21 Activities (2011;$17.
Post-Impressionists created personal, 'purely imaginary forms' which contain a "state of mind," synthesizing vision and design.
Xanthe Brooke, who curated the show with Charlotte Keenan and exhibition consultant David Bingham, said: "The works by the European Post-Impressionists represent a momentous shift in the western art world, which served to encourage radical British artists like those of the Sandon Studios Society to champion their work and try and emulate it.
Afterwards, post-impressionists like van Gogh pushed its boundaries and experimented with the style.
The drawings range from pen and ink sketches to fully realized work from the Renaissance to the Post-impressionists.
The exhibition, The Impressionist Landscape from Corot to van Gogh, will showcase some of the MFA's most famous works beginning with Barbizon School painters Camille Corot and Theodore Rousseau and continuing through to the Impressionists and Post-Impressionists with Eugene Boudin, Paul Cezanne, Paul Gauguin, Vincent van Gogh, Claude Monet, and Pierre-Auguste Renoir.
In between there are six chapters on the Italian renaissance, the renaissance in northern Europe, the seventeenth century, 'rococo to neo-classicism', the birth or the modern world (the Romantics to the Pre-Raphaelites, Goya and Millais), impressionists and post-impressionists (Monet to Cezanne).
Henning positions himself as an heir to all those whose work has displayed a flair for the lush and the strange, from the painters of the Baroque to Courbet, Manet, the post-Impressionists, Matisse, and more recently, the likes of Sigmar Polke, Eric Fischl, and David Salle.