post-bellum


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post-bellum

(ˈpəʊstˈbɛləm)
adj
(prenominal) of or during the period after a war, esp the American Civil War
[C19: Latin post after + bellum war]
References in periodicals archive ?
Naturalising the causes of the civil war was, for Draper, a key means for fostering in the post-bellum era what he called "more philosophical, more enlarged, more enlightened, and, in truth, more benevolent views of each other's proceedings.
Synopsis: The practice of plural marriage, commonly known as polygamy, stirred intense controversy in post-bellum America until 1890, when the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints first officially abolished the practice.
In the post-bellum South, they enforced white supremacy, and largely arrested black people on trumped-up charges in order to feed them into convict labor systems.
The authors place their story firmly within the context of the city's rapid post-bellum economic transformation.
Today's interventions, to be considered right and just, must establish a better state of peace post-bellum.
As part of the Milledgeville National Register Historic District, Liberty Street contains some of the best preserved and unique examples of ante- and post-bellum architecture within the city.
The stricken, Medusan images have a peculiar power of desolation and of reaching into the desperate historical predicament of the post-bellum South.
Drawing on historical, cultural, and material cultural texts as well as literary texts by women (some mainstream, some little known then or now), the essays consider the roles of women and their growing economic, social, and political power in American society in the post-bellum period through the Progressive Era.
He describes post-bellum US society as sailing "a dangerous sea of seething currents and undercurrents" tossed and turned by the "blind fury of parties, infidelity, (an) entire lack of first-class captains and leaders, (and the) plentiful meanness and vulgarity of the ostensible masses.
Post-Bellum, Pre- Harlem: African American Literature and Culture, 1877-1919.
Brian Orend, in thinking through the nature of the post-bellum task, utilizes the metaphor of radical surgery, which is an extreme yet necessary measure undertaken in the interest of a future greater good.
This point, according to Wild, was clarified by the distinction between military campaigns in the name of political Islam and post-bellum preaching and missionary work.

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