postface

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postface

(ˈpəʊstfəs)
n
(Journalism & Publishing) any statement or information at the end of a text, the opposite of a preface
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Secondly, there is no cast-iron evidence in the form of prefaces or postfaces to Chinese works added by Korean editors and included in Japanese editions, as happened in the Edo period.
The text's never-ending ending is condemned to successive epilogues of "silence" and "tomb years," postfaces and postscripts, all the way to the endless opening of the final question mark, suggesting that "all writing sprawls out into silence" (406).
The postface of The Tongue's Blood Does Not Run Dry explains how Djebar defines the difference between short story and narrative.
But he focuses here on the two authorial postfaces appended to his most celebrated work, Baopuzi, translated as The Master Embracing Simplicity.
Reign dates appear on the bases of porcelain bowls, on lacquer vases and Buddhist stelae, in the prefaces or postfaces of woodblock printed books and on copper cash.
D'apres Genette (1982: 155), la paratextualite qui englobe des elements comme titres, sous-titres, intertitres, epigraphes, prefaces, postfaces, illustrations et commentaires marginaux influence aussi bien la portee du discours que la reception du texte par le public.
She notes that both narrator and author share the same characteristic of 'variabilite', and cites in this connection the innumerable 'volte-face' to be found in Montherlant's prefaces and postfaces.
the blurbs); the dedications and the inscriptions; the epigraphs; the prefaces (introductions, forewords, postfaces, etc.
In that same year he wrote three different postfaces, all for individual followers, and it seems clear that he was recommending it to them.
For example, Tong 'in sihwa, a collection of poems in Chinese by Korean poets edited by So Kojong (1420-1488), appears to have reached Japan as a gift from a Korean ambassador in 1655, according to the postface to the Japanese edition of 1687.
i) The Commentaries on the Nineteen Abbreviated Histories was printed in Japan with movable type in the Keicho era (1596-1615) and again in 1617, on both occasions including a postface by a Korean dated 1582.