postfracture

postfracture

(ˌpəʊstˈfræktʃə)
adj
taking place after a fracture
References in periodicals archive ?
None of the patients experienced complications relating to prosthesis loosening, joint dislocation, patella problems, tibial postfracture, or nerve injury.
The fourth recommendation looks at the organization of postfracture care and the need for a systematic approach to identify those who may be at risk for subsequent fractures, starting with the suggestion that any patient older than 50 years with a recent fracture should be assessed.
Effect of prefracture Versus postfracture dietary assessment on hip fracture risk estimates.
s prefracture ABC score was evaluated; therefore, inferences about balance confidence impacting postfracture function or falls risk could not be made.
At 6 mo postfracture, compared with long-term care unit residents, communitydwelling residents regained more prefracture function and residential status was significantly associated with risk-adjusted functional recovery [12].
The objective was to validate a model of postfracture pain in perching birds, in 21 adult domestic pigeons.
Hip fractures are the most costly, owing to the expense of initial hospital care, first-year postfracture care, and long-term treatment.
0003) Retrospective (7) Increased risk of nonunion with exposure to NSAIDs 60-90 days postfracture (RR=3.
A program of extended physiotherapy reduced the fall rate by 25%, compared with standard postfracture physiotherapy; high-dose vitamin D therapy reduced the hospital readmission rate by 39%, compared with a lower dose, the researchers found.
Typical postfracture behavior of these specimens is presented in Fig.
Finally, an adjustment for costs of excess mortality was calculated on a quarterly basis during the first postfracture year for occurrences in the vertebral spine, distal femur proximal humerus, pelvis, and tibia.