postglacial


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post·gla·cial

 (pōst-glā′shəl)
adj.
Relating to or occurring during the time following a glacial period.

postglacial

(pəʊstˈɡleɪsɪəl)
adj
(Geological Science) formed or occurring after a glacial period, esp after the Pleistocene epoch
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.postglacial - relating to or occurring during the time following a glacial period
Translations

postglacial

[ˈpəʊstˈgleɪsɪəl] ADJposglacial
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References in periodicals archive ?
2013), and the relatively fast postglacial uplift, which enables the preservation of the older ridges.
All of these bedrock formations are overlain by Quaternary and postglacial sedimentary units of variable thickness, composition, and age.
Glacial bottleneck and postglacial recolonization of a seed parasitic weevil, Curculio hilgendorfi, inferred from mitochondrial DNA variation.
Postglacial expansion and not human influence best explains the population structure in the endangered kea (.
Future studies will have to determine if the current distribution of PUUV can be explained by the postglacial colonization of Germany by bank voles of the Western evolutionary lineage from western refugia through southern Germany (13-15).
Host density drives the postglacial migration of the tree parasite, Epifagus virginiana.
Thirdly, beside the heterogeneous landscapes and high species richness, the Czech Republic represents an interesting area also in terms of historical biogeography because it is situated at the crossroads of postglacial colonisation routes (Hewitt 2000) and in the proximity to Carpathian refuges, recently proposed for various species (Kotlik et al.
Understanding the postglacial emergence of an unglaciated and biologically viable corridor between the retreating Cordilleran and Laurentide ice sheets is a key part of the debate on human colonisation of the Americas," the study authors wrote.
2007, Postglacial land uplift model and system definition for the new Swedish height system RH 2000.
Specifically, this region, which was once covered by an ice sheet that reached a thickness of 3-4 km at the peak of the last glacial cycle, is currently experiencing a postglacial rebound of the solid crust at rates of approximately 1 cm/yr (Mitrovica et al.
1998) propose that the current distribution of beech in central Europe derives from the postglacial recolonization of populations originating mainly from the Balkan refugia.

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