posthole


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post·hole

 (pōst′hōl′)
n.
A hole dug in the ground to hold a fence post.

posthole

(ˈpəʊstˌhəʊl)
n
a hole dug in the ground to hold a post
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.posthole - a hole dug in the ground to hold a fence post
hole - an opening deliberately made in or through something
References in periodicals archive ?
Roger Armitage posted a photo of a posthole on Albany Road at Dalton which he said had been reported several times and was "an accident waiting to happen'.
Everything from posthole augers, log splitters, snow blowers, and even small backhoes for ditching and digging can make a smaller tractor a workhorse on your land.
Then she went to Files Cemetery and used a pair of posthole diggers to excavate a hole in the middle of her father's grave.
Using a posthole digger or shovel, plant the base of the cut tree approximately two to three feet into the ground.
In early 1943, Dad took a Model T rear end, a part of a car frame, a cut-down Gleaner combine auger, an IHC sliding PTO shaft - all of which he had on hand or got at the Mose Levy junkyard - up to Waggoner Welding in Washington (Dad did not have a welder) and got them welded into a posthole digger.
It's a relative of Toro's Dingo, which is a tracked bulldozer-like machine that accepts various attachments on the front such as loaders and posthole augers.
Dig your posthole at least six inches deeper than normal.
Out came the posthole diggers and my packing stick and, at a rate of two posts a day, Grandma and Grandpa built a six-foot high fence around that garden.
There is no posthole evidence that this structure was completely circular, suggesting the posts may have supported a simple windbreak or lean-to-like structure.
The other store focuses on rentals that assist in bigger jobs like digging trenches, taking down trees with chain saws and building fences with posthole diggers.
My favourite object in Welsh history is actually not the common potsherd I was writing about, but rather the equally common posthole - the differently coloured soil defining where once upon a time, a hole had been dug that was used for putting up a wooden pole.
The columnar posthole stains are directly adjacent to basalt kerbstones and were probably support poles for Feature 3's wooden superstructure.