postilion

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pos·til·ion

also pos·til·lion  (pō-stĭl′yən, pŏ-)
n.
One who rides the near horse of the leaders to guide the horses drawing a coach.

[French postillon, from Italian postiglione, from posta, mail, from Old Italian, mail station; see post3.]

postilion

(pɒˈstɪljən) or

postillion

n
(Horse Training, Riding & Manège) a person who rides the near horse of the leaders in order to guide a team of horses drawing a coach
[C16: from French postillon, from Italian postiglione, from posta post3]

pos•til•ion

(poʊˈstɪl yən, pɒ-)

n.
a person who rides the left horse of the leading or only pair of horses drawing a carriage.
Also, esp. Brit.,pos•til′lion.
[1580–90; earlier postillon < Middle French < Italian postiglione]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.postilion - someone who rides the near horse of a pair in order to guide the horses pulling a carriage (especially a carriage without a coachman)postilion - someone who rides the near horse of a pair in order to guide the horses pulling a carriage (especially a carriage without a coachman)
equestrian, horseback rider, horseman - a man skilled in equitation
Translations

postilion

[pəsˈtɪlɪən] Npostillón m

postil(l)ion

nReiter(in) m(f)des Sattelpferdes
References in classic literature ?
Jingle, completely coated with mud thrown up by the wheels, was plainly discernible at the window of his chaise; and the motion of his arm, which was waving violently towards the postillions, denoted that he was encouraging them to increased exertion.
On those occasions, when a servant had given me notice, my custom was to go immediately to the door, and, after paying my respects, to take up the coach and two horses very carefully in my hands (for, if there were six horses, the postillion always unharnessed four,) and place them on a table, where I had fixed a movable rim quite round, of five inches high, to prevent accidents.
In their fear, silence fell upon them, and a postillion, in the guise of a demon, passed in front of them, blowing, in lieu of a bugle, a huge hollow horn that gave out a horrible hoarse note.
D'Artagnan and Planchet took each a post horse, and a postillion rode before them.