postindustrial


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post·in·dus·tri·al

 (pōst′ĭn-dŭs′trē-əl)
adj.
Of or relating to a period in the development of an economy or nation in which the relative importance of manufacturing lessens and that of services, information, and research grows.

postindustrial

(ˌpəʊstɪnˈdʌstrɪəl)
adj
(Sociology) characteristic of, relating to, or denoting work or a society that is no longer based on heavy industry

postindustrial

Describing a country or economy in which traditional heavy industries have declined in importance and have been largely replaced by service industries.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.postindustrial - of or relating to a society or economy marked by a lessened importance of manufacturing and an increase of services, information, and research; "postindustrial countries"
industrial - having highly developed industries; "the industrial revolution"; "an industrial nation"
Translations

postindustrial

postindustrial

[ˌpəʊstɪnˈdʌstrɪəl] adjpostindustriale
References in periodicals archive ?
Beautiful Wasteland: The Rise of Detroit as America's Postindustrial Frontier
People in the postindustrial world don't always get a sound night's sleep.
00pm Kevin McCloud follows the progress of Stephen Yeoman and Anita Findlay, who want to build a cutting-edge, postindustrial house covered in rusty metal.
A sampling of topics: music, migration, and the urban experience in Barcelona; Austin, Texas and music, race, and the selling of a city; the digital underground in the postindustrial city; Amsterdam's translocal jazz scene; and nightlife in Paris, Berlin, and London.
Taken together, they gesture toward new definitions of work, in new postindustrial context, and offer insight for defining technical communication in the postindustrial age.
The shredder is used to reduce the size of postindustrial plastic and wood scrap to be used as fuel.
1 standards (10% or more postindustrial recycled content).
Plant scrap repelletizing systems for postindustrial scrap recovers costly roll scrap, cut-outs and other waste and reduces size of scrap to manageable inventory.
The content also addresses change forces, the changing nature of schooling, consternation within the profession, how to strengthen scholarship and research on the preparatory function and the evolution to a postindustrial world.
People & Places describes the design process of three different types of places, examines the present state of "place making", precendents from the past, and the rapid cultural changes of the postindustrial electronic age.
The building's towering brick and metal interior--along with the narrow corridors of its basement--invoke the postindustrial spaces that have housed the New York art scene for forty-odd years, and the sooty, scavenged air native to such settings helped to unite disparate modes of production: Fritz Welch's intricate progression of forms and processes rendered in iodine, wire, dust, glitter, fabric, found grafitti-sprayed wood paneling, and more; Seth Price's hostage-execution images, downloaded from the Internet and silk-screened onto crumpled clear polyester film; SOL'SAX's life-size, clothed ceramic-and-wire figures of African Americans, with the gangsta and the glamorous alike hung unnervingly upside down.
He adopts the neigh-borhood rather than the city as his primary unit of analysis; explores the experiences of Jews, African Americans, and to some extent Puerto Ricans within the same space; and moves the temporal focus forward into the emerging postindustrial era.