postliminy


Also found in: Legal.

postliminy

(pəʊstˈlɪmɪnɪ) or

postliminium

n, pl -inies or -inia (-ɪnɪə)
(Law) international law the right by which persons and property seized in war are restored to their former status on recovery
[C19: (in this sense): from Latin postlīminium a return behind one's threshold, from līmen threshold]
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
But if the population, which formed the state, has been dispersed, I think it more correct not to consider the people as the same, nor to restore their property by postliminy in accordance with the law of nations, for the reason that a people, like a ship, obviously perishes by the dissolution of its parts, since its whole nature consists in perpetual union.
The law of nations was given the explanation that "all nations make use of it," and it "deals with the occupation of habitations, with building, fortification, war, captivity, servitude, postliminy [the law under which something lost as a result of captivity is restored to the original owner from whom the item was taken], treaties, armistices, truces, the obligation of not harming ambassadors, and the prohibition of marriage with aliens.