postmillennial


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post·mil·len·ni·al

 (pōst′mə-lĕn′ē-əl) also post·mil·len·ni·an (-ən)
adj.
Happening or existing after the millennium.

postmillennial

(ˌpəʊstmɪˈlɛnɪəl)
adj
(Theology) existing or taking place after the millennium
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.postmillennial - of or relating to the period following the millennium
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References in periodicals archive ?
Postmillennial interpretations heavily influenced the early missionaries, as many foresaw a coming epoch of reason, peace, and godliness that would pervade the earth and lead to Christ's return.
Pfeffer's decision to investigate postmillennial metaphysics (new materialism, etc.
This critical guide selects Indian authors writing in English that embody the "New India" of the postmillennial age.
In Chapter 2, "'My Passport Says Shawn': Toward a Hip-Hop Cosmopolitanism," Neal situates Jay-Z within the hip-hop's postmillennial milieu of global marketing and local authenticity; subsequently, Neal queers JayZ's performance in virtue of his non-normative performances (e.
Chapter 5 asserts that redeeming the marketplace is not just a good idea but is a postmillennial requirement for all Christians to bring in the kingdom (95).
Andrew Gowers's 2006 report on ip for the uk Treasury cites both the 1840s term extension debate and postmillennial economic studies to conclude "that the length of protection for copyright works already far exceeds the incentives required to invest in new works," that "the optimal length of copyright is at most seven years," and "that the extra incentives to create as a result of term extension are likely to be very small beyond a term of 25 years" (50).
Zombies capture a postmillennial structure of feeling, including the fear and helplessness that accompanies the paralysis of risk-managing institutions.
Moreover, he observes that "when churches split over premillennial, postmillennial, and amillennial interpretations of the book, [they] generally missed [its] discipleship mandate" (24).
Moreover, Kostlevy provides a case study of the emergence of the more radical premillennial and apolitical holiness movements that embraced healing, denominational separatism, ecstatic worship, and women in leadership from the early nineteenth-century postmillennial holiness movement connected to abolition and social reform.
Topics include the implications of time, space, and psychology in Ballard's early fiction; the influence of Surrealism on The Atrocity Exhibition; Crash as a site of Gothic horror and humor; Ballard's cinematic imagination and the film adaptations of The Atrocity Exhibition, Crash, and Empire of the Sun; Ballard's literary renderings of his own life; the shifting significance of the city of London across Ballard's career; Cocaine Nights and Super-Cannes as nightmare utopias and Ballard's response to the shifting landscapes of postwar Europe; and representations of violence, sacrifice, and community in Ballard's postmillennial fictions.
They possessed a postmillennial eschatology that gave them reason to be optimistic about their community-building endeavors; they were, after all, going to help usher in the Kingdom of God.
Dead Man's Cell Phone," in the New Theatre, is Sarah Ruhl's metaphysical romp through postmillennial culture, high and low.