postmodernist


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post·mod·ern

 (pōst-mŏd′ərn)
adj.
1. Of or relating to art, architecture, or literature that reacts against earlier modernist principles, as by reintroducing traditional or classical elements of style or by carrying modernist styles or practices to extremes: "It [a roadhouse]is so architecturally interesting ... with its postmodern wooden booths and sculptural clock" (Ruth Reichl).
2. Of or relating to an intellectual stance often marked by eclecticism and irony and tending to reject the universal validity of such principles as hierarchy, binary opposition, categorization, and stable identity.

post·mod′ern·ism n.
post·mod′ern·ist adj. & n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.postmodernist - of or relating to postmodernism; "postmodernist architecture"
Translations
postmodernipostmodernisti
postmodernepostmoderniste

postmodernist

[ˈpəʊstˈmɒdənɪst] ADJ & Nposmodernista mf
References in periodicals archive ?
Citing Brian McHale's Postmodernist Fiction, which concentrates on the postmodernists interest in transgressing ontological boundaries, and noting Stoppards almost trademark interest in metatheatrical devices, Jernigan argues:
I first came to know McHale's work by reading his 1987 book Postmodernist Fiction when I was conducting my Ph.
America in literature and film; modernist perceptions, postmodernist representations.
Each of these failures are summarily addressed in three chapters that read Theresa Hak Kyung Cha's Dictee, Thomas Pynchon's Gravity's Rainbow, and Bessie Head's A Question of Power against their interpretation within postmodernist readings, which Kim finds steeped in an otherness postmodernism "limited by essentialist determinations based on the author's identity and narrow notions of the ideological valences of narrative form" She argues that such postmodernist readings do not account for the novels' "subtler and more complex understandings of ideology, culture, and identity" (2).
Does postmodernist refer to the cultural paradigm of postmodernity?
Urban Bush Women founder Zollar and African-born Acogny combine African and modern styles, while deLavallade and Mclntyre shine in theatrical dance, and Miller explores movement as a postmodernist.
Reading the work of playwright Wendy Wasserstein through a postmodernist lens, Lewis highlights the "flexible possibilities for American Jewish identity" and shows how her plays challenge notions of a monolithic and stable sense of who and what is Jewish.
Postmodernist historians (I vowed I would never start a sentence, let alone a column, with the word 'postmodernist', but there we are) reckon that we cannot learn anything meaningful from old documents.
Instead of constructing a master narrative of Kirk as postmodernist, Russello makes discrete arguments in each of his chapters, which tackle by turns Kirk's ideas about history, politics, and jurisprudence, and the general relationship between "Conservatism, Modernity, and the Postmodern.
The resolution to the Arab Middle East's problems, according to Sadiki, ultimately should emerge from a dialectic that reconciles Islamist with postmodernist thought.
HISTORICAL DICTIONARY OF POSTMODERNIST LITERATURE AND THEATER.
addresses it to specialists, and not just those strongly conversant with the authors presented, but mostly to those comfortable with the peculiar rhetoric and strategy characterizing post-Heideggerian and postmodernist philosophy.