postocular


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Related to postocular: postictal, postprandial, Preocular, supraocular, subocular, postfebrile

postocular

(ˌpəʊstˈɒkjʊlə)
adj
(Anatomy) located behind the eye
n
(Zoology) a scale situated behind the eye of some lizards
References in periodicals archive ?
Lower postocular bristles (including ventral hairs) pale.
1) well developed, consisting of: large pore (B') immediately adjacent to each posterior nostril, two unpaired pores (C and D) at anterior and posterior interobital, a pore (E), behind rear, upper corner of orbit, a postocular pore (F) followed by pair of pores (G and H') above preoperculum, pair of pores above operculum (K' and L',), and three pores (M', N, and 0') along posterior margin of preopeculum.
Postocular area dark red-brown to black, moderately silver pruinose, dorsal setae moderately developed, pale yellow-white, other setae fine white.
Head: wider than long, the anterior process short with small clypeus; gena reduced, not exceeding apex of clypeus; antenniferous tubercles blunt; eyes large, semiglobose; postocular margins broadly rounded without tubercles or spine, not exceeding outer margins of eyes, converging on constricted neck; antenna long and stout, first and fourth segments subequal in length, second shortest, third longest, first incrassate, second, third and fourth clavate, fourth with pilose apex (Fig.
Carapace: anterior margin with a little dark spot in its median area, around the median notch; ocular tubercle and area around the lateral ocelli dark brown; and in the median part of the carapace there are two irregular dark stripes that surround the ocular tubercle, the postocular furrow, and the anterior longitudinal sulcus.
berlepschi females as white below with a white postocular stripe, and a buff-tinged throat (Meyer de Schauensee 1970, Schuchmann 1999, Ridgely and Greenfield 2001, Mata et al.
borealis reach 10 cm standard length and lack distinct postocular spines, possess a long cirrus at the base of the nasal spine, the first or second dorsal-fin spines are not longer than the third or fourth, and the two rows of ctenoid scales below the dorsal fins extend onto the caudal peduncle (Bolin, 1936; Mecklenburg et al.
In addition, four aspects of head scalation were ranked (number-coded) as follows: number of anterior supralabials 2/2 (1), 1/2 (2), 1/1 (3), 0/1 (4), 0/0 (5); number of supraoculars 1/1 (1), 1/0 (2), 0/0 (3); complete separation of parietal scale from posterior supralabial by a postocular scale on both sides (1), touching on one side (2), touching on both sides (3) and number of rows of scales around tail 10 (1), 12 (2).
Head much spinous; nasal, preocular, supraocular, postocular, tympanic, coronal, parietal, and nuchal spines present; upper and posterior margins of orbit provided with many accessory spines; parietal ridge not conspicuous.
Setulae and setae on head black; occiput with row of 5 strong postocular setae (uppermost one being vt), lower half of occiput with minute pale setulae; ocellar tubercle weak with 2 long oc and 2 pairs of very short posterior setulae.
Diagnosis: The following combination of characters will assist in recognition of Karliella as being distinct from other anthomyiid genera: femora and tibiae extensively or wholly light-coloured, ochre-brown to yellow; abdomen with paired dark spots at anterior margins of tergites III-V, both laterodorsally and ventrally; arista plumose, longest rays at least 2/3 as long as width of postpedicel; upper occiput bare below postocular setae; vein C bare on the dorsal surface and setulose on the ventral surface; hind tibia with 1-4 pd setae, none of them reaching half the length of hind tarsomere 1, and with a short apical pv seta.