postsynchronization

postsynchronization

(pəʊstˌsɪŋkrənaɪˈzeɪʃən) or

postsynchronisation

n
(Film) the process of adding sound, such as dubbing, to a film or video after shooting or videotaping is completed
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References in periodicals archive ?
According to Chaume Varela, the three generally accepted conventions for sound postsynchronization are lip synchrony (synchrony between the lip movements of the screen actor and the dialogue of the voice artist), kinetic synchrony (synchronization between the dialogue and the head, arm or body movements of the screen actor) and isochrony (the exact timing of the screen actor's opening and closing of the mouth and the deliverance of the dubbing dialogue).
As he writes, "Synchresis is what makes dubbing, postsynchronization, and sound-effects mixing possible, and enables such a wide array of choices in these processes.
However, in a rare and demanding move, all singing was performed and recorded live on the set, eschewing the postsynchronization common to the format.
Such a technique appears especially noteworthy in terms of an Italian national cinema which, more than any other, has persistently relied upon postdubbing and postsynchronization.
In what follows, I begin with remarks on the historiography of the cinema of the occupation, and then explore the stylistic specificity of occupation-era cinema through inquiry into three topics: microphone placement, postsynchronization, and the electronic manipulation of sound.
By the end of the decade, members of the film community had come to regard such traces as intolerable technical flaws (although trade-press editorials defending direct sound and rejecting postsynchronization appeared as late as 1934).
An example of extensive postsynchronization pertinent to film noir is Prison sans barreaux (Leonid Moguy, January 1938), for which W.
While postsynchronization became standard practice in Hollywood as early as 1933, in France as late as 1939 films continued to include scenes that featured no post-production mixing whatever.
Filmmakers during the occupation advocated postsynchronization because they recognized its favourable effects on the viewer's perception.