postulate

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pos·tu·late

 (pŏs′chə-lāt′)
tr.v. pos·tu·lat·ed, pos·tu·lat·ing, pos·tu·lates
1. To assume or assert the truth, reality, or necessity of, especially as a basis of an argument: "We can see individuals, but we can't see providence; we have to postulate it" (Aldous Huxley).
2. To propose as a hypothesis or explanation: Researchers now postulate that the disease is caused by a virus.
3. To assume as a premise or axiom; take for granted.
4. Archaic To make claim for; demand.
n. (pŏs′chə-lĭt, -lāt′)
1. Something assumed without proof as being self-evident or generally accepted, especially when used as a basis for an argument: "the postulate that there is little moral difference between the superpowers" (Henry A. Kissinger).
2. A fundamental element; a basic principle.
3. Mathematics An axiom.
4. Archaic A requirement; a prerequisite.

[Medieval Latin postulāre, postulāt-, to nominate to a bishopric, to assume, from Latin, to request; see prek- in Indo-European roots.]

pos′tu·la′tion n.

postulate

vb (tr; may take a clause as object)
1. to assume to be true or existent; take for granted
2. to ask, demand, or claim
3. to nominate (a person) to a post or office subject to approval by a higher authority
n
4. something taken as self-evident or assumed as the basis of an argument
5. a necessary condition or prerequisite
6. a fundamental principle
7. (Mathematics) logic maths an unproved and indemonstrable statement that should be taken for granted: used as an initial premise or underlying hypothesis in a process of reasoning
[C16: from Latin postulāre to ask for, require; related to pōscere to request]
ˌpostuˈlation n

pos•tu•late

(v. ˈpɒs tʃəˌleɪt; n. -lɪt, -ˌleɪt)

v. -lat•ed, -lat•ing,
n. v.t.
1. to claim or assume the existence or truth of, esp. as a basis for reasoning or arguing.
2. to ask, demand, or claim.
3. to assume without proof, or as self-evident; take for granted.
4. Math., Logic. to assume as a postulate.
n.
5. something taken as self-evident or assumed without proof as a basis for reasoning.
6. Math., Logic. a proposition that requires no proof, being self-evident, or that is for a specific purpose assumed true, and that is used in the proof of other propositions; axiom.
7. a fundamental principle.
8. a necessary condition; prerequisite.
[1525–35; < Latin postulātum petition, thing requested, n. use of neuter past participle of postulāre to request, demand, akin to pōscere to request]
pos`tu•la′tion, n.

pos·tu·late

(pŏs′chə-lĭt)
A principle that is accepted as true without proof; an axiom.

postulate


Past participle: postulated
Gerund: postulating

Imperative
postulate
postulate
Present
I postulate
you postulate
he/she/it postulates
we postulate
you postulate
they postulate
Preterite
I postulated
you postulated
he/she/it postulated
we postulated
you postulated
they postulated
Present Continuous
I am postulating
you are postulating
he/she/it is postulating
we are postulating
you are postulating
they are postulating
Present Perfect
I have postulated
you have postulated
he/she/it has postulated
we have postulated
you have postulated
they have postulated
Past Continuous
I was postulating
you were postulating
he/she/it was postulating
we were postulating
you were postulating
they were postulating
Past Perfect
I had postulated
you had postulated
he/she/it had postulated
we had postulated
you had postulated
they had postulated
Future
I will postulate
you will postulate
he/she/it will postulate
we will postulate
you will postulate
they will postulate
Future Perfect
I will have postulated
you will have postulated
he/she/it will have postulated
we will have postulated
you will have postulated
they will have postulated
Future Continuous
I will be postulating
you will be postulating
he/she/it will be postulating
we will be postulating
you will be postulating
they will be postulating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been postulating
you have been postulating
he/she/it has been postulating
we have been postulating
you have been postulating
they have been postulating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been postulating
you will have been postulating
he/she/it will have been postulating
we will have been postulating
you will have been postulating
they will have been postulating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been postulating
you had been postulating
he/she/it had been postulating
we had been postulating
you had been postulating
they had been postulating
Conditional
I would postulate
you would postulate
he/she/it would postulate
we would postulate
you would postulate
they would postulate
Past Conditional
I would have postulated
you would have postulated
he/she/it would have postulated
we would have postulated
you would have postulated
they would have postulated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.postulate - (logic) a proposition that is accepted as true in order to provide a basis for logical reasoning
Bayes' postulate - (statistics) the difficulty of applying Bayes' theorem is that the probabilities of the different causes are seldom known, in which case it may be postulated that they are all equal (sometimes known as postulating the equidistribution of ignorance)
logic - the branch of philosophy that analyzes inference
proposition - (logic) a statement that affirms or denies something and is either true or false
assumption, premise, premiss - a statement that is assumed to be true and from which a conclusion can be drawn; "on the assumption that he has been injured we can infer that he will not to play"
Verb1.postulate - maintain or assert; "He contended that Communism had no future"
claim - assert or affirm strongly; state to be true or existing; "He claimed that he killed the burglar"
2.postulate - take as a given; assume as a postulate or axiom; "He posited three basic laws of nature"
presuppose, suppose - take for granted or as a given; suppose beforehand; "I presuppose that you have done your work"
insist, assert - assert to be true; "The letter asserts a free society"
3.postulate - require as useful, just, or proper; "It takes nerve to do what she did"; "success usually requires hard work"; "This job asks a lot of patience and skill"; "This position demands a lot of personal sacrifice"; "This dinner calls for a spectacular dessert"; "This intervention does not postulate a patient's consent"
exact, claim, take - take as an undesirable consequence of some event or state of affairs; "the accident claimed three lives"; "The hard work took its toll on her"
govern - require to be in a certain grammatical case, voice, or mood; "most transitive verbs govern the accusative case in German"
draw - require a specified depth for floating; "This boat draws 70 inches"
cost - require to lose, suffer, or sacrifice; "This mistake cost him his job"
cry for, cry out for - need badly or desperately; "This question cries out for an answer"
compel - necessitate or exact; "the water shortage compels conservation"

postulate

verb (Formal) presuppose, suppose, advance, propose, assume, put forward, take for granted, predicate, theorize, posit, hypothesize Freud postulated that we all have a death instinct.

postulate

verb
To take for granted without proof:
Informal: reckon.
noun
Something taken to be true without proof:
Translations
postulát
oletus
postulat
postulo
postulerepostulat
axiompostulatpostulera

postulate

A. [ˈpɒstjʊlɪt] Npostulado m
B. [ˈpɒstjʊleɪt] VTpostular

postulate

[ˈpɒstjʊleɪt] vtpostuler

postulate

nPostulat nt
vtpostulieren; theoryaufstellen

postulate

[ˈpɒstjʊˌleɪt] vt (frm) → postulare
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As he puts it, the justification for postulating realism is not evidential at all but functional (p.
McSwain refers to this process as the "reverse salient," postulating, that a reverse salient often occurs during times of "social flux.