pot-holed

pot-holed

adj
characterized by deep holes, esp ones produced in a road surface by wear or weathering
Translations

pot-holed

[ˈpɒtˌhəʊld] ADJ [road] → lleno de baches
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References in periodicals archive ?
British motorists face an assault course of pot-holed roads with 12,000 miles of tarmac now awaiting repair enough road to stretch half way around the world, according to the latest research from LV= Road Rescue.
PARENT P S who claim children's lives are being put at risk as they walk to school along "hazardous" pot-holed roads were today due to present a petition to councillors calling for urgent action to improve safety.
The road is privately owned and is known for being heavily pot-holed and subject to flooding.
The fact is, the sale of this unused piece of land, across the road from the 234 acre Sefton Park, will help to raise funds to rebuild the pot-holed roads around the park at a cost of PS6m; to resurface the running track around the park for people who want to go running there; to build a stage in the park to allow us to put on events and bring people into the park; and to clean out the lake and allow us to keep on running the hugely popular pedalos.
I, for one, have witnessed a significant reduction in driving speeds on the pot-holed roads that I use during the day.
PETER MacDONALD last night warned title-chasing Rangers to beware of the pot-holed Perth pitch.
Jamie Linton, 22, was trapped in Marc Vacara's Vauxhall Astra after it veered off a pot-holed track in Magor, South Wales, and plunged into a ditch.
This budget form of the Lightning is geared more for town use with an upright riding position and suspension set soft to soak up the pot-holed city streets.
IT will take 15 years and EUR2billion to sort out Ireland's pot-holed roads, it was claimed yesterday.
The energy- efficient activity has long been used as a way for kickballers young and old to hone their ball-control and passing skills on an area much smaller than the grassy, pot-holed pitch.
At the height of a bumper crop in 2004, trucks waited for a week in a traffic jam stretching more than 100 kilometers at Paranagua, Latin America's largest grain port, before slowly winding their way to unload their cargo through narrow, pot-holed roads, already teeming with local motorists.
The referee ruled that the cracked and pot-holed pitch was too dangerous - an opinion shared by Southam manager John Hanna and Griff boss Dave Stringer.