potent


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po·tent

 (pōt′nt)
adj.
1. Possessing inner or physical strength; powerful.
2.
a. Exerting or capable of exerting strong physiological or chemical effects: potent liquor; a potent toxin.
b. Exerting or capable of exerting strong influence; cogent: potent arguments.
3. Having great control or authority: "The police were potent only so long as they were feared" (Thomas Burke).
4. Able to achieve and maintain an erection that allows for sexual intercourse. Used of a male.

[Middle English, from Latin potēns, potent-, present participle of posse, to be able; see poti- in Indo-European roots.]

po′tent·ly adv.
po′tent·ness n.

potent

(ˈpəʊtənt)
adj
1. possessing great strength; powerful
2. (of arguments, etc) persuasive or forceful
3. influential or authoritative
4. tending to produce violent physical or chemical effects: a potent poison.
5. (of a male) capable of having sexual intercourse
[C15: from Latin potēns able, from posse to be able]
ˈpotently adv
ˈpotentness n

potent

(ˈpəʊtənt)
adj
(Heraldry) heraldry (of a cross) having flat bars across the ends of the arms
[C17: from obsolete potent a crutch, from Latin potentia power]

po•tent1

(ˈpoʊt nt)

adj.
1. powerful; mighty.
2. cogent; persuasive.
3. producing powerful physical or chemical effects: a potent drug.
4. having or exercising great power or influence.
5. (of a male) capable of sexual intercourse.
[1490–1500; < Latin potent- (s. of potēns), present participle of posse to be able, have power; see -ent]
po′tent•ly, adv.

po•tent2

(ˈpoʊt nt)
adj.
(of a heraldic cross) having a crosspiece at the extremity of each arm.
[1325–75; Middle English potente crutch, variant of potence < French crutch, support < Medieval Latin potentia, Latin: power, potency]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.potent - having great influence
influential - having or exercising influence or power; "an influential newspaper"; "influential leadership for peace"
2.potent - having or wielding force or authority; "providing the ground soldier with increasingly potent weapons"
powerful - having great power or force or potency or effect; "the most powerful government in western Europe"; "his powerful arms"; "a powerful bomb"; "the horse's powerful kick"; "powerful drugs"; "a powerful argument"
3.potent - having a strong physiological or chemical effect; "a potent toxin"; "potent liquor"; "a potent cup of tea", "a stiff drink"
effective, effectual, efficacious - producing or capable of producing an intended result or having a striking effect; "an air-cooled motor was more effective than a witch's broomstick for rapid long-distance transportation"-LewisMumford; "effective teaching methods"; "effective steps toward peace"; "made an effective entrance"; "his complaint proved to be effectual in bringing action"; "an efficacious law"
fertile - capable of reproducing
powerful - having great power or force or potency or effect; "the most powerful government in western Europe"; "his powerful arms"; "a powerful bomb"; "the horse's powerful kick"; "powerful drugs"; "a powerful argument"
impotent - lacking power or ability; "Technology without morality is barbarous; morality without technology is impotent"- Freeman J.Dyson; "felt impotent rage"
4.potent - (of a male) capable of copulation
impotent - (of a male) unable to copulate

potent

adjective
1. powerful, commanding, dynamic, dominant, influential, authoritative a potent political force
3. strong, powerful, mighty, vigorous, forceful, efficacious, puissant The drug is extremely potent, but can have unpleasant side-effects.
strong weak, impotent

potent

adjective
1. Having great physical strength:
2. Having a high concentration of the distinguishing ingredient:
3. Having or able to exert great power:
Translations
قوي، فَعّال
mocnýsilný
kraftig
öflugur
potencija
spēcīgsstiprs

potent

[ˈpəʊtənt] ADJpotente, poderoso; [drink] → fuerte; [remedy] → eficaz

potent

[ˈpəʊtənt] adj
[argument, symbol, mix, force, image] → puissant(e)
a potent weapon → une arme puissante
[drink] → fort(e); [drug] → puissant(e)
(= able to have sex) [man] → viril

potent

adj drink, drug, charm, motive etcstark; argument, reason etcdurchschlagend; weapon, combination, imagestark, mächtig, durchschlagend; reminderstark, beeindruckend; manpotent; rulermächtig

potent

[ˈpəʊtnt] adj (gen) → potente, forte (fig) (argument, reason) → validissimo/a

potent

(ˈpəutənt) adjective
powerful; strong. a potent drink.
ˈpotency noun

po·tent

a. potente, fuerte; eficaz, que posse potencia.

potent

adj potente
References in classic literature ?
Believe me the single word of Langford is not of such potent intelligence as to supersede the necessity of more.
O charms more potent than the rapt Chaldee Ever drew down from out the quiet stars!
Others contended that the stigma had not been produced until a long time subsequent, when old Roger Chillingworth, being a potent necromancer, had caused it to appear, through the agency of magic and poisonous drugs.
But above all, and to give a bacchanalian grace to this truly masculine repast, the captain produced his mellifluous keg of home-brewed nectar, which had been so potent over the senses of the veteran of Hudson's Bay.
More potent intoxicants these than any that need licenses for their purveyance, responsible-- see the poets--for no end of human foolishness.
There is in human nature generally, more of the fool than of the wise; and therefore those faculties, by which the foolish part of men's minds is taken, are most potent.
He bolts down all events, all creeds, and beliefs, and persuasions, all hard things visible and invisible, never mind how knobby; as an ostrich of potent digestion gobbles down bullets and gun flints.
It was useless to change the subject--the evil influence that was on me was too potent to be charmed away by talk.
Besides, from the ashes of the burned scraps of the whale, a potent ley is readily made; and whenever any adhesiveness from the back of the whale remains clinging to the side, that ley quickly exterminates it.
We could ill spare any of them when they were so potent in paying car-fare for oneself and a girl.
I, too, in the grey, small, antique structure, with its low roof, its latticed casements, its mouldering walls, its avenue of aged firs--all grown aslant under the stress of mountain winds; its garden, dark with yew and holly--and where no flowers but of the hardiest species would bloom--found a charm both potent and permanent.
Joyful sounds will 'come ringing down the wind;' a wealth of gypsy gold will be ours for the gathering; we will learn the potent, unutterable charm of a dim spruce wood and the grace of flexile mountain ashes fringing a lonely glen; we will tryst with the folk of fur and feather; we'll hearken to the music of gray old firs.