pothunter

(redirected from pothunting)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

pot·hunt·er

 (pŏt′hŭn′tər)
n.
1. One who hunts game for food, ignoring the rules of sport.
2. One who participates in contests simply to win prizes.
3. A person who seeks artifacts from past civilizations for personal use, sometimes by illegal means, without adhering to professional standards of archaeology.

pot′hunt′ing n.

pothunter

(ˈpɒtˌhʌntə)
n
1. (Hunting) a person who hunts for food or for profit without regard to the rules of sport
2. informal a person who enters competitions for the sole purpose of winning prizes
ˈpotˌhunting n, adj

pot•hunt•er

(ˈpɒtˌhʌn tər)

n.
1. a person who hunts for food or profit, ignoring the rules of sport.
2. a person who takes part in contests merely to win prizes.
[1585–95]
pot′hunt`ing, n., adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pothunter - a nonprofessional archeologist
archaeologist, archeologist - an anthropologist who studies prehistoric people and their culture
2.pothunter - someone who participates in contests in order to collect trophies
contestant - a person who participates in competitions
3.pothunter - someone who hunts for food (not for sport)
hunter, huntsman - someone who hunts game
Translations

pothunter

[ˈpɒthʌntəʳ] Ncazador(a) m/f de premios
References in periodicals archive ?
Such a move was tried in the past and only succeeded in putting many jackpot regulars off the whole idea of pothunting.
THE Brummies are on a pothunting mission in their biggest meeting of the season at Perry Barr tomorrow night (6pm).
While the tribes have clearly gained ground in Oregon and have strengthened their position with respect to the determination of their cultural resources, there are still further steps that can be taken to deter vandalism, pothunting, and wanton development.
Souvenance had been pothunting in Ireland before getting bogged down in desperate ground in a Listed race at Hamburg in June.
Domestic interest and foreign demand for Native American contemporary art and antiquities has fueled an epidemic of pothunting, or looting, of ancient habitation sites and Native American burial grounds.