potter's field


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potter's field

n.
A place for the burial of unknown or indigent persons.

[From the potter's field mentioned in Matthew 27:7.]

potter's field

n
1. US a cemetery where the poor or unidentified are buried at the public expense
2. (Bible) New Testament the land bought by the Sanhedrin with the money paid for the betrayal of Jesus (which Judas had returned to them) to be used as a burial place for strangers and the friendless poor (Acts 1:19; Matthew 27:7)

pot′ter's field′


n.
(sometimes caps.)
a burial place for unidentified persons and the poor. Matt. 27:7.
[1526 (Tindale)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.potter's field - a cemetery for unknown or indigent peoplepotter's field - a cemetery for unknown or indigent people
References in classic literature ?
In the register of the potter's field I shall soon have both.
It's quite clear her heart is as insensible to eloquence and poetry, as a Potter's Field wall, and it might answer to try her with a little truth.
Ona was not yet buried; but the police had been notified, and on the morrow they would put the body in a pine coffin and take it to the potter's field.
FROM POTTER'S FIELD | PATRICIA CORNWELL (3 WEEKS ON LIST)
Plans for a fan park at Potter's Field near Tower Bridge were at an advanced stage but were dropped by the Mayor of London's office when archaeological Bronze Age finds were uncovered on the coach park.
NEW ORLEANS (AP) -- Seashells and gravel crunched under Linda Lagarde's heels as she walked into Holt Cemetery, the city-owned potter's field in Mid-City.
The Insignia's launch took place in Potter's Field in London on Monday, within sight of Tower Bridge and overlooked by the Mayor's office.
Historic documents indicate the eastern two-thirds of the park in Greenwich Village was used as a potter's field from 1797-1825 and that thousands of people may have been interred there.
For 70 years, county officials have held private ceremonies on land donated for a potter's field beside 130-year-old Evergreen Cemetery in Boyle Heights, the oldest public cemetery in Los Angeles.
About 3,000 (5 percent) of New York City's 60,000 annual deaths require some form of city burial assistance, of which about 1,500 adults and 1,000 or more infant and stillborn children are buried annually on Hart Island, the local potter's field (Corn, 2000; New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, 2005).
As he pictures their consignment to Potter's Field, dour Jem Hallam, newly arrived from England, muses "and so they entered time, a conveyance more reliable than boats.
Most evocatively, he describes the women suffering from the venereal disease that was a consequence of their occupation, who banded together to mob a detested nurse in the almshouse, and who celebrated the life of a fellow prostitute with an improvised wake at Potter's Field burial ground.