poultice

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poul·tice

 (pōl′tĭs)
n.
A soft moist mass of bread, meal, clay, or other adhesive substance, usually heated, spread on cloth, and applied to warm, moisten, or stimulate an aching or inflamed part of the body. Also called cataplasm.
tr.v. poul·ticed, poul·tic·ing, poul·tic·es
To apply a poultice to.

[Middle English pultes, from Medieval Latin pultēs, thick paste, from Latin, pl. of puls, pult-, pottage; see pulse2.]

poultice

(ˈpəʊltɪs)
n
1. (Medicine) med Also called: cataplasm a local moist and often heated application for the skin consisting of substances such as kaolin, linseed, or mustard, used to improve the circulation, treat inflamed areas, etc
2. slang Austral a large sum of money, esp a debt
[C16: from earlier pultes, from Latin puls a thick porridge]

poul•tice

(ˈpoʊl tɪs)

n., v. -ticed, -tic•ing. n.
1. a soft, moist mass of cloth, bread, meal, herbs, etc., applied hot as a medicament to the body.
v.t.
2. to apply a poultice to.
[1535–45; earlier pultes < Latin, pl. (taken as singular) of puls (s. pult-) porridge. See pulse2]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.poultice - a medical dressing consisting of a soft heated mass of meal or clay that is spread on a cloth and applied to the skin to treat inflamed areas or improve circulation etc.poultice - a medical dressing consisting of a soft heated mass of meal or clay that is spread on a cloth and applied to the skin to treat inflamed areas or improve circulation etc.
medical dressing, dressing - a cloth covering for a wound or sore
mustard plaster, sinapism - a plaster containing powdered black mustard; applied to the skin as a counterirritant or rubefacient
Verb1.poultice - dress by covering with a therapeutic substance
practice of medicine, medicine - the learned profession that is mastered by graduate training in a medical school and that is devoted to preventing or alleviating or curing diseases and injuries; "he studied medicine at Harvard"
dress - apply a bandage or medication to; "dress the victim's wounds"
Translations

poultice

[ˈpəʊltɪs]
A. Ncataplasma f, emplasto m
B. VTponer una cataplasma a, emplastar (with con)

poultice

[ˈpəʊltɪs] ncataplasme m

poultice

nUmschlag m, → Wickel m; (for boil) → Zugpflaster nt
vteinen Umschlag or Wickel machen um; boilein Zugpflaster kleben auf (+acc)

poultice

[ˈpəʊltɪs] nimpiastro, cataplasma m

poul·tice

n. cataplasma, emplasto.

poultice

n emplasto, cataplasma
References in classic literature ?
As it was I must have been laid up for quite a while, though Dian's poultices of herbs and leaves finally reduced the swelling and drew out the poison.
My wife she make a poultice of leaves--they cure me," said the Indian.
At last I reached my own box, and had some corn; and after Robert had wrapped up my knees in wet cloths, he tied up my foot in a bran poultice, to draw out the heat and cleanse it before the horse-doctor saw it in the morning, and I managed to get myself down on the straw, and slept in spite of the pain.
Then, in a distant, Missionary way he asked them certain questions - as why little Joe had that hole in his frill: who said, Pa, Flopson was going to mend it when she had time - and how little Fanny came by that whitlow: who said, Pa, Millers was going to poultice it when she didn't forget.
And the larger sheet, which had enclosed the rest, seemed by its first cramp line, "To poultice chestnut mare" -- a farrier's bill
The neighbour ran, and in came a brisk little old lady in cap and specs, with a bundle of herbs under her arm, which she at once applied in all sorts of funny ways, explaining their virtues as she clapped a plantain poultice here, put a pounded catnip plaster there, or tied a couple of mullein leaves round the sufferer's throat.
This was very torturing indeed; and I don't think I ever felt such perfect gratification and gratitude of heart, as I did when I heard from the ship's doctor that he had been obliged to put a large mustard poultice on this very gentleman's stomach.
But immediately afterward Maggie had reflected that if she drove many nails in she would not be so well able to fancy that the head was hurt when she knocked it against the wall, nor to comfort it, and make believe to poultice it, when her fury was abated; for even aunt Glegg would be pitiable when she had been hurt very much, and thoroughly humiliated, so as to beg her niece's pardon.
The soothing massage combines warm sand poultices and aromatherapy oils to alleviate pain and promote comfort, instantly melting away tension and regulating energy flux.
A Pound of Cure: Health Care in the 19th Century Meet costumed interpreters depicting medical experts of the period who will create poultices, teas and other remedies from "The Family Nurse,'' a 19th-century advice book written by Lydia Maria Child.
In the meanwhile, Himalayan hot poultices are pressed along the neck and shoulders.
My nan is no longer here to make me poultices - or bread and dripping amuse-bouche.