pounce

(redirected from pounce on)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

pounce 1

 (pouns)
intr.v. pounced, pounc·ing, pounc·es
1. To spring or swoop with intent to seize someone or something: a cat that pounced on a mouse; watched the falcon pounce on the baby rabbit.
2. To attack or criticize suddenly: troops that pounced on a convoy; a reporter who pounced on a politician's change of position.
3. To turn the attention to and try to take advantage of: pounce on an opportunity; pounced on his mistake.
n.
The act or an instance of pouncing.

[From Middle English, pointed tool, talon of a hawk, shortening of ponson, pointed tool, variant of punchon, pointed tool; see puncheon1.]

pounc′er n.

pounce 2

 (pouns)
n.
1. A fine powder formerly used to smooth and finish writing paper and soak up ink.
2. A fine powder, such as pulverized charcoal, dusted over a stencil to transfer a design to an underlying surface.
tr.v. pounced, pounc·ing, pounc·es
1. To sprinkle, smooth, or treat with pounce.
2. To transfer (a stenciled design) with pounce.

[French ponce, from Old French, from Vulgar Latin *pōmex, *pōmic-, from Latin pūmex, pumice.]

pounc′er n.

pounce 3

 (pouns)
tr.v. pounced, pounc·ing, pounc·es
To ornament (metal, for example) by perforating from the back with a pointed implement.

[Middle English pouncen, probably from Old French poinssonner, from poinson, pointed tool; see puncheon1.]

pounce

(paʊns)
vb
(intr; often foll by on or upon) to spring or swoop, as in capturing prey
n
1. the act of pouncing; a spring or swoop
2. (Zoology) the claw of a bird of prey
[C17: apparently from Middle English punson pointed tool; see puncheon2]
ˈpouncer n

pounce

(paʊns)
vb
(Crafts) (tr) to emboss (metal) by hammering from the reverse side
[C15 pounsen, from Old French poinçonner to stamp; perhaps the same as pounce1]

pounce

(paʊns)
n
1. (Historical Terms) a very fine resinous powder, esp of cuttlefish bone, formerly used to dry ink or sprinkled over parchment or unsized writing paper to stop the ink from running
2. (Art Terms) a fine powder, esp of charcoal, that is tapped through perforations in paper corresponding to the main lines of a design in order to transfer the design to another surface
3. (as modifier): a pounce box.
vb (tr)
4. (Historical Terms) to dust (paper) with pounce
5. (Art Terms) to transfer (a design) by means of pounce
[C18: from Old French ponce, from Latin pūmex pumice]
ˈpouncer n

pounce1

(paʊns)

v. pounced, pounc•ing,
n. v.i.
1. to swoop down or spring suddenly, as an animal in seizing its prey.
2. to seize eagerly or suddenly: We pounced on the opportunity.
3. to make a sudden attack: to pounce on every mistake.
n.
4. a sudden swoop, as or as if on an object of prey.
5. the claw or talon of a bird of prey.
[1375–1425; late Middle English; perhaps akin to punch1]
pounc′ing•ly, adv.

pounce2

(paʊns)

v.t. pounced, pounc•ing.
to emboss (metal) by hammering on an instrument applied on the reverse side.
[1350–1400; Middle English; perhaps identical with pounce1]

pounce3

(paʊns)

n., v. pounced, pounc•ing. n.
1. a fine powder, as of cuttlebone, formerly used to prevent ink from spreading in writing, or to prepare parchment for writing.
2. a fine powder, often of charcoal, used in transferring a design through a perforated pattern.
v.t.
3. to sprinkle, smooth, or prepare with pounce.
4. to trace (a design) with pounce.
[1700–10; < French ponce « Latin pūmicem, acc. of pūmex pumice]

pounce


Past participle: pounced
Gerund: pouncing

Imperative
pounce
pounce
Present
I pounce
you pounce
he/she/it pounces
we pounce
you pounce
they pounce
Preterite
I pounced
you pounced
he/she/it pounced
we pounced
you pounced
they pounced
Present Continuous
I am pouncing
you are pouncing
he/she/it is pouncing
we are pouncing
you are pouncing
they are pouncing
Present Perfect
I have pounced
you have pounced
he/she/it has pounced
we have pounced
you have pounced
they have pounced
Past Continuous
I was pouncing
you were pouncing
he/she/it was pouncing
we were pouncing
you were pouncing
they were pouncing
Past Perfect
I had pounced
you had pounced
he/she/it had pounced
we had pounced
you had pounced
they had pounced
Future
I will pounce
you will pounce
he/she/it will pounce
we will pounce
you will pounce
they will pounce
Future Perfect
I will have pounced
you will have pounced
he/she/it will have pounced
we will have pounced
you will have pounced
they will have pounced
Future Continuous
I will be pouncing
you will be pouncing
he/she/it will be pouncing
we will be pouncing
you will be pouncing
they will be pouncing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been pouncing
you have been pouncing
he/she/it has been pouncing
we have been pouncing
you have been pouncing
they have been pouncing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been pouncing
you will have been pouncing
he/she/it will have been pouncing
we will have been pouncing
you will have been pouncing
they will have been pouncing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been pouncing
you had been pouncing
he/she/it had been pouncing
we had been pouncing
you had been pouncing
they had been pouncing
Conditional
I would pounce
you would pounce
he/she/it would pounce
we would pounce
you would pounce
they would pounce
Past Conditional
I would have pounced
you would have pounced
he/she/it would have pounced
we would have pounced
you would have pounced
they would have pounced
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pounce - the act of pouncingpounce - the act of pouncing      
leap, leaping, bounce, bound, saltation, spring - a light, self-propelled movement upwards or forwards
Verb1.pounce - move down on as if in an attack; "The raptor swooped down on its prey"; "The teacher swooped down upon the new students"
come down, descend, go down, fall - move downward and lower, but not necessarily all the way; "The temperature is going down"; "The barometer is falling"; "The curtain fell on the diva"; "Her hand went up and then fell again"
stoop - descend swiftly, as if on prey; "The eagle stooped on the mice in the field"

pounce

verb
1. attack, strike, jump, leap, swoop Before I could get to the pigeon, the cat pounced.
pounce on something or someone
1. attack, ambush, leap at, take someone by surprise, take someone unawares At that moment, a guard pounced on him.
2. spring on, attack, snatch, jump on, drop on, swoop on, fall upon, leap at, dash at, bound onto like a tiger pouncing on its prey
Translations
هُجوم مُفاجِئ، إنْقِضاضيَنْقَضًّ على، يَهْجِم
výpadvyrazitvyskočit
kaste sig overkasten sig over
hirtelen lecsapás
stökk; snögg árásstökkva á
staiga pultistaiga šoktistaiga užpultistaiga užšoktistaigus šuolis
mesties virsūuzbruktuzbrukumsuzklupiensuzklupt
planiti
atılmasaldırmasaldırmaküzerine atlamak

pounce

[ˈpaʊns]
nbond m
vi
[animal] → bondir
[person] → bondir
pounce on
vt fus
[animal] [+ prey] → bondir sur
[+ person] → bondir sur
(= seize on) [+ mistake, failings] → se jeter sur; [+ news, idea, words] → se jeter sur
His mother pounced on it when he admitted that he'd not been to school
BUT Sa mère saisit la balle au bond lorsqu'il admit qu'il n'avait pas été à l'école.
The papers pounced on it
BUT Les journaux se sont emparés de l'affaire.

pounce

nSprung m, → Satz m; (= swoop) (by bird) → Angriff m; (by police) → Zugriff m
vi (cat, lion etc)einen Satz machen; (bird)niederstoßen; (fig)zuschlagen; to pounce on somebody/something (lit, fig)sich auf jdn/etw stürzen; the tiger pounced on its preyder Tiger stürzte sich auf seine Beute; the police pounced on himdie Polizei griff sich (dat)ihn

pounce

[paʊns]
1. nbalzo
2. vi (cat, tiger) → balzare (sulla preda); (bird) → piombare (sulla preda)
to pounce on sb/sth (animal) → balzare su qn/qc (bird) → piombare su qn/qc (person) → piombare or balzare su qn/qc
she pounced on my offer of help → ha colto al volo la mia offerta di aiuto
he pounced on my suggestion that ... (attack) → è saltato su quando ho proposto che...

pounce

(pauns) verb
to jump suddenly, in order to seize or attack. The cat waited beside the bird-cage, ready to pounce.
noun
an act of pouncing; a sudden attack. The cat made a pounce at the bird.
pounce on
to leap upon (eg one's prey) in order to attack or grab it. The tiger pounced on its victim.
References in classic literature ?
I'm going to pounce on him and have another try directly I see him.
Thou mayst, I think, succeed in taking her from her Saxon friends, but how thou wilt rescue her afterwards from the clutches of Bois-Guilbert seems considerably more doubtful He is a falcon well accustomed to pounce on a partridge, and to hold his prey fast.
This plan succeeded; and Signor Pastrini himself ran to him, excusing himself for having made his excellency wait, scolding the waiters, taking the candlestick from the porter, who was ready to pounce on the traveller and was about to lead him to Albert, when Morcerf himself appeared.