pounce

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pounce 1

 (pouns)
intr.v. pounced, pounc·ing, pounc·es
1. To spring or swoop with intent to seize someone or something: a cat that pounced on a mouse; watched the falcon pounce on the baby rabbit.
2. To attack or criticize suddenly: troops that pounced on a convoy; a reporter who pounced on a politician's change of position.
3. To turn the attention to and try to take advantage of: pounce on an opportunity; pounced on his mistake.
n.
The act or an instance of pouncing.

[From Middle English, pointed tool, talon of a hawk, shortening of ponson, pointed tool, variant of punchon, pointed tool; see puncheon1.]

pounc′er n.

pounce 2

 (pouns)
n.
1. A fine powder formerly used to smooth and finish writing paper and soak up ink.
2. A fine powder, such as pulverized charcoal, dusted over a stencil to transfer a design to an underlying surface.
tr.v. pounced, pounc·ing, pounc·es
1. To sprinkle, smooth, or treat with pounce.
2. To transfer (a stenciled design) with pounce.

[French ponce, from Old French, from Vulgar Latin *pōmex, *pōmic-, from Latin pūmex, pumice.]

pounc′er n.

pounce 3

 (pouns)
tr.v. pounced, pounc·ing, pounc·es
To ornament (metal, for example) by perforating from the back with a pointed implement.

[Middle English pouncen, probably from Old French poinssonner, from poinson, pointed tool; see puncheon1.]

pounce

(paʊns)
vb
(intr; often foll by on or upon) to spring or swoop, as in capturing prey
n
1. the act of pouncing; a spring or swoop
2. (Zoology) the claw of a bird of prey
[C17: apparently from Middle English punson pointed tool; see puncheon2]
ˈpouncer n

pounce

(paʊns)
vb
(Crafts) (tr) to emboss (metal) by hammering from the reverse side
[C15 pounsen, from Old French poinçonner to stamp; perhaps the same as pounce1]

pounce

(paʊns)
n
1. (Historical Terms) a very fine resinous powder, esp of cuttlefish bone, formerly used to dry ink or sprinkled over parchment or unsized writing paper to stop the ink from running
2. (Art Terms) a fine powder, esp of charcoal, that is tapped through perforations in paper corresponding to the main lines of a design in order to transfer the design to another surface
3. (as modifier): a pounce box.
vb (tr)
4. (Historical Terms) to dust (paper) with pounce
5. (Art Terms) to transfer (a design) by means of pounce
[C18: from Old French ponce, from Latin pūmex pumice]
ˈpouncer n

pounce1

(paʊns)

v. pounced, pounc•ing,
n. v.i.
1. to swoop down or spring suddenly, as an animal in seizing its prey.
2. to seize eagerly or suddenly: We pounced on the opportunity.
3. to make a sudden attack: to pounce on every mistake.
n.
4. a sudden swoop, as or as if on an object of prey.
5. the claw or talon of a bird of prey.
[1375–1425; late Middle English; perhaps akin to punch1]
pounc′ing•ly, adv.

pounce2

(paʊns)

v.t. pounced, pounc•ing.
to emboss (metal) by hammering on an instrument applied on the reverse side.
[1350–1400; Middle English; perhaps identical with pounce1]

pounce3

(paʊns)

n., v. pounced, pounc•ing. n.
1. a fine powder, as of cuttlebone, formerly used to prevent ink from spreading in writing, or to prepare parchment for writing.
2. a fine powder, often of charcoal, used in transferring a design through a perforated pattern.
v.t.
3. to sprinkle, smooth, or prepare with pounce.
4. to trace (a design) with pounce.
[1700–10; < French ponce « Latin pūmicem, acc. of pūmex pumice]

pounce


Past participle: pounced
Gerund: pouncing

Imperative
pounce
pounce
Present
I pounce
you pounce
he/she/it pounces
we pounce
you pounce
they pounce
Preterite
I pounced
you pounced
he/she/it pounced
we pounced
you pounced
they pounced
Present Continuous
I am pouncing
you are pouncing
he/she/it is pouncing
we are pouncing
you are pouncing
they are pouncing
Present Perfect
I have pounced
you have pounced
he/she/it has pounced
we have pounced
you have pounced
they have pounced
Past Continuous
I was pouncing
you were pouncing
he/she/it was pouncing
we were pouncing
you were pouncing
they were pouncing
Past Perfect
I had pounced
you had pounced
he/she/it had pounced
we had pounced
you had pounced
they had pounced
Future
I will pounce
you will pounce
he/she/it will pounce
we will pounce
you will pounce
they will pounce
Future Perfect
I will have pounced
you will have pounced
he/she/it will have pounced
we will have pounced
you will have pounced
they will have pounced
Future Continuous
I will be pouncing
you will be pouncing
he/she/it will be pouncing
we will be pouncing
you will be pouncing
they will be pouncing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been pouncing
you have been pouncing
he/she/it has been pouncing
we have been pouncing
you have been pouncing
they have been pouncing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been pouncing
you will have been pouncing
he/she/it will have been pouncing
we will have been pouncing
you will have been pouncing
they will have been pouncing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been pouncing
you had been pouncing
he/she/it had been pouncing
we had been pouncing
you had been pouncing
they had been pouncing
Conditional
I would pounce
you would pounce
he/she/it would pounce
we would pounce
you would pounce
they would pounce
Past Conditional
I would have pounced
you would have pounced
he/she/it would have pounced
we would have pounced
you would have pounced
they would have pounced
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pounce - the act of pouncingpounce - the act of pouncing      
leap, leaping, bounce, bound, saltation, spring - a light, self-propelled movement upwards or forwards
Verb1.pounce - move down on as if in an attack; "The raptor swooped down on its prey"; "The teacher swooped down upon the new students"
come down, descend, go down, fall - move downward and lower, but not necessarily all the way; "The temperature is going down"; "The barometer is falling"; "The curtain fell on the diva"; "Her hand went up and then fell again"
stoop - descend swiftly, as if on prey; "The eagle stooped on the mice in the field"

pounce

verb
1. attack, strike, jump, leap, swoop Before I could get to the pigeon, the cat pounced.
pounce on something or someone
1. attack, ambush, leap at, take someone by surprise, take someone unawares At that moment, a guard pounced on him.
2. spring on, attack, snatch, jump on, drop on, swoop on, fall upon, leap at, dash at, bound onto like a tiger pouncing on its prey
Translations
هُجوم مُفاجِئ، إنْقِضاضيَنْقَضًّ على، يَهْجِم
výpadvyrazitvyskočit
kaste sig overkasten sig over
hirtelen lecsapás
stökk; snögg árásstökkva á
staiga pultistaiga šoktistaiga užpultistaiga užšoktistaigus šuolis
mesties virsūuzbruktuzbrukumsuzklupiensuzklupt
planiti
atılmasaldırmasaldırmaküzerine atlamak

pounce

[ˈpaʊns]
nbond m
vi
[animal] → bondir
[person] → bondir
pounce on
vt fus
[animal] [+ prey] → bondir sur
[+ person] → bondir sur
(= seize on) [+ mistake, failings] → se jeter sur; [+ news, idea, words] → se jeter sur
His mother pounced on it when he admitted that he'd not been to school
BUT Sa mère saisit la balle au bond lorsqu'il admit qu'il n'avait pas été à l'école.
The papers pounced on it
BUT Les journaux se sont emparés de l'affaire.

pounce

nSprung m, → Satz m; (= swoop) (by bird) → Angriff m; (by police) → Zugriff m
vi (cat, lion etc)einen Satz machen; (bird)niederstoßen; (fig)zuschlagen; to pounce on somebody/something (lit, fig)sich auf jdn/etw stürzen; the tiger pounced on its preyder Tiger stürzte sich auf seine Beute; the police pounced on himdie Polizei griff sich (dat)ihn

pounce

[paʊns]
1. nbalzo
2. vi (cat, tiger) → balzare (sulla preda); (bird) → piombare (sulla preda)
to pounce on sb/sth (animal) → balzare su qn/qc (bird) → piombare su qn/qc (person) → piombare or balzare su qn/qc
she pounced on my offer of help → ha colto al volo la mia offerta di aiuto
he pounced on my suggestion that ... (attack) → è saltato su quando ho proposto che...

pounce

(pauns) verb
to jump suddenly, in order to seize or attack. The cat waited beside the bird-cage, ready to pounce.
noun
an act of pouncing; a sudden attack. The cat made a pounce at the bird.
pounce on
to leap upon (eg one's prey) in order to attack or grab it. The tiger pounced on its victim.
References in periodicals archive ?
Among the good horses maddock was associated with were the Duke of Devonshire's popular mare Park Top, The Pouncer, Althrey Don, mountain Call and Laureate.
MATERIALS Plain canvas tote * Martha Stewart adhesive silkscreen alphabet set (Michaels) * 2 colors of fabric paint * Martha Stewart foam pouncer screw top (Michaels) * Paper bag
As I observed the light fading in Cemento's eyes whilst the Pottery Pouncer illuminated her, I felt an unusual bond with her.