pound


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Related to pound: Pound force, pound sterling, Ezra Pound

pound 1

 (pound)
n.
1. Abbr. lb.
a. A unit of weight equal to 16 ounces (453.592 grams).
b. A unit of apothecary weight equal to 12 ounces (373.242 grams). See Table at measurement.
2. A unit of weight differing in various countries and times.
3.
4.
a. The primary unit of currency in the United Kingdom, worth 20 shillings or 240 old pence before the decimalization of 1971. Also called pound sterling.
b. See Table at currency.
5. The primary unit of currency in Ireland and Cyprus before the adoption of the euro.
6. A primary unit of currency in Scotland before the Act of Union (1707). Also called pound scots.
7. The pound key on a telephone.

[Middle English, from Old English pund, from West Germanic *punda-, from Latin (lībra) pondō, (a pound) by weight; see (s)pen- in Indo-European roots.]

pound 2

 (pound)
v. pound·ed, pound·ing, pounds
v.tr.
1.
a. To strike repeatedly and forcefully, especially with the hand or a tool: pounded the nail with a hammer. See Synonyms at beat.
b. To assault with military force: pounded the bunker with mortars.
c. To beat to a powder or pulp; pulverize or crush: pound corn into meal.
2. To instill by persistent, emphatic repetition: pounded knowledge into the students' heads.
3. To produce energetically, as from forceful use of the hands. Often used with out: "a tinny piano pounding out Happy Birthday down the block" (Laura Kascischke).
4. To cause harm or loss to; affect adversely: stocks that were pounded when energy prices rose.
5. To defeat soundly: pounded their rivals in the season finale.
6. To attack verbally; criticize: was pounded for months in the press.
7. Slang To drink quickly (a beverage, especially an alcoholic one). Often used with back or down: pounded back a few beers after work.
v.intr.
1. To strike vigorous, repeated blows: He pounded on the table.
2. To move along heavily and noisily: The children pounded up the stairs.
3. To pulsate rapidly and heavily; throb: My heart pounded.
4. To move or work laboriously: a ship that pounded through heavy seas.
n.
1. A heavy blow.
2. The sound of a heavy blow; a thump.
3. The act of pounding.
Idiom:
pound the pavement Slang
To travel the streets on foot, especially in search of work.

[Middle English pounden, alteration of pounen, from Old English pūnian.]

pound′er n.

pound 3

 (pound)
n.
1. A public enclosure for the confinement of stray animals, especially dogs.
2. A place in which vehicles impounded by the authorities are held until redeemed by their owners.
3.
a. An enclosure in which animals, especially farm animals, are kept.
b. A container, as on a boat, in which fish are kept.
4. Archaic A prison.
tr.v. pound·ed, pound·ing, pounds
To confine (an animal) in a pound.

[Middle English, from Old English pund-, enclosure (as in pundfall, pen).]

pound

(paʊnd)
vb
1. (when: intr, often foll by on or at) to strike heavily and often
2. (tr) to beat to a pulp; pulverize
3. (tr) to instil by constant drilling: to pound Latin into him.
4. (foll by: out) to produce, as by typing heavily
5. to walk (the pavement, street, etc) repeatedly: he pounded the pavement looking for a job.
6. (intr) to throb heavily
n
7. a heavy blow; thump
8. the act of pounding
[Old English pūnian; related to Dutch puin rubble]
ˈpounder n

pound

(paʊnd)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) an enclosure, esp one maintained by a public authority, for keeping officially removed vehicles or distrained goods or animals, esp stray dogs
2. a place where people are confined
3.
a. a trap for animals
b. a trap or keepnet for fish. See pound net
vb
(tr) to confine in or as if in a pound; impound, imprison, or restrain
[C14: from Late Old English pund- as in pundfeald pinfold]

pound

(paʊnd)
n
1. (Units) an avoirdupois unit of weight that is divided into 16 ounces and is equal to 0.453 592 kilograms. Abbreviation: lb
2. (Units) a troy unit of weight divided into 12 ounces equal to 0.373 242 kilograms. Abbreviation: lb tr or lb t
3. (Units) an apothecaries' unit of weight, used in the US, that is divided into 5760 grains and is equal to one pound troy
4. (Units) (not in technical usage) a unit of force equal to the mass of 1 pound avoirdupois where the acceleration of free fall is 32.174 feet per second per second. Abbreviation: lbf
5. (Currencies)
a. the standard monetary unit of the United Kingdom, the Channel Islands, the Isle of Man, and various UK overseas territories, divided into 100 pence. Official name: pound sterling
b. (as modifier): a pound coin.
6. (Currencies) (the standard monetary unit of the following countries)
a. Cyprus: divided into 100 cents
b. Egypt: divided into 100 piastres
c. Lebanon: divided into 100 piastres
d. Sudan: divided into 100 piastres
e. South Sudan: divided into 100 piastres
f. Syria: divided into 100 piastres
7. (Currencies) another name for lira2
8. (Historical Terms) Also called: pound Scots a former Scottish monetary unit originally worth an English pound but later declining in value to 1 shilling 8 pence
9. (Currencies) Also called: punt the former standard monetary unit of the Republic of Ireland, divided into 100 pence; replaced by the euro in 2002
[Old English pund, from Latin pondō pound; related to German Pfund pound, Latin pondus weight]

Pound

(paʊnd)
n
(Biography) Ezra (Loomis). 1885–1972, US poet, translator, and critic, living in Europe. Indicted for treason by the US government (1945) for pro-Fascist broadcasts during World War II, he was committed to a mental hospital until 1958. He was a founder of imagism and championed the early work of such writers as T. S. Eliot, Joyce, and Hemingway. His life work, the Cantos (1925–70), is an unfinished sequence of poems, which incorporates mythological and historical materials in several languages as well as political, economic, and autobiographical elements

pound1

(paʊnd)

v.t.
1. to strike repeatedly with great force, as with an instrument, the fist, heavy missiles, etc.
2. to produce or effect by or as if by striking or thumping (often fol. by out).
3. to force (a way) by battering; batter (often fol. by down).
4. to crush into a powder or paste by beating repeatedly.
v.i.
5. to strike heavy blows repeatedly.
6. to beat or throb violently, as the heart.
7. to give forth a thumping sound.
8. to walk or go with heavy steps.
9. to work with force or vigor (often fol. by away).
n.
10. the act of pounding.
11. a heavy or forcible blow.
12. a thump.
Idioms:
pound the pavement, Informal. to walk the streets unremittingly, as to find work.
[before 1000; Middle English pounen, Old English pūnian; akin to Dutch puin rubbish]
pound′er, n.
syn: See beat.

pound2

(paʊnd)

n., pl. pounds, (collectively) pound.
1. a unit of weight and of mass, varying in different periods and countries.
2.
a. (in English-speaking countries) an avoirdupois unit of weight equal to 7000 grains, divided into 16 ounces (0.453 kg), used for ordinary commerce. Abbr.: lb., lb. av.
b. a troy unit of weight, in the U.S. and formerly in Britain, equal to 5760 grains, divided into 12 ounces (0.373 kg), used for precious metals. Abbr.: lb. t.
c. (in the U.S.) a unit of apothecaries' weight equal to 5760 grains, divided into 12 ounces (0.373 kg).
3. Also called pound sterling. the basic monetary unit of the United Kingdom, formerly equal to 20 shillings or 240 pence: equal to 100 new pence after decimalization in 1971.Abbr.: L; Symbol:£
4. the basic monetary unit of Cyprus, Egypt, Lebanon, Sudan, and Syria.
5. punt 4.
6. a former monetary unit of various countries, as Israel, Libya, and Nigeria.
Idioms:
pound of flesh, something justly owed but costly to the payer.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English pund (c. Dutch pond, German Pfund, Old Norse, Gothic pund) « Latin pondō pound, abl. of pondus weight, in the phrase libra pondō a pound by weight; see libra]

pound3

(paʊnd)

n.
1. an enclosure maintained by public authorities for confining stray or homeless animals.
2. an enclosure for sheltering, keeping, confining, or trapping animals.
3. an enclosure or trap for fish.
4. a place of confinement or imprisonment.
5. a place where illegally parked vehicles are impounded.
[1350–1400; Middle English poond; compare late Old English pund- in pundfald pinfold; akin to pond]

Pound

(paʊnd)

n.
1. Ezra Loomis, 1885–1972, U.S. poet.
2. Roscoe, 1870–1964, U.S. legal scholar and botanist.

pound

(pound)
A unit of weight equal to 16 ounces (about 453.6 grams). See Table at measurement. See Note at weight.

pound


Past participle: pounded
Gerund: pounding

Imperative
pound
pound
Present
I pound
you pound
he/she/it pounds
we pound
you pound
they pound
Preterite
I pounded
you pounded
he/she/it pounded
we pounded
you pounded
they pounded
Present Continuous
I am pounding
you are pounding
he/she/it is pounding
we are pounding
you are pounding
they are pounding
Present Perfect
I have pounded
you have pounded
he/she/it has pounded
we have pounded
you have pounded
they have pounded
Past Continuous
I was pounding
you were pounding
he/she/it was pounding
we were pounding
you were pounding
they were pounding
Past Perfect
I had pounded
you had pounded
he/she/it had pounded
we had pounded
you had pounded
they had pounded
Future
I will pound
you will pound
he/she/it will pound
we will pound
you will pound
they will pound
Future Perfect
I will have pounded
you will have pounded
he/she/it will have pounded
we will have pounded
you will have pounded
they will have pounded
Future Continuous
I will be pounding
you will be pounding
he/she/it will be pounding
we will be pounding
you will be pounding
they will be pounding
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been pounding
you have been pounding
he/she/it has been pounding
we have been pounding
you have been pounding
they have been pounding
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been pounding
you will have been pounding
he/she/it will have been pounding
we will have been pounding
you will have been pounding
they will have been pounding
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been pounding
you had been pounding
he/she/it had been pounding
we had been pounding
you had been pounding
they had been pounding
Conditional
I would pound
you would pound
he/she/it would pound
we would pound
you would pound
they would pound
Past Conditional
I would have pounded
you would have pounded
he/she/it would have pounded
we would have pounded
you would have pounded
they would have pounded

pound

(lb) A unit of mass equal to 453.59 g.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pound - 16 ounces avoirdupoispound - 16 ounces avoirdupois; "he got a hernia when he tried to lift 100 pounds"
avoirdupois unit - any of the units of the avoirdupois system of weights
oz., ounce - a unit of weight equal to one sixteenth of a pound or 16 drams or 28.349 grams
half pound - 8 ounces avoirdupois
stone - an avoirdupois unit used to measure the weight of a human body; equal to 14 pounds; "a heavy chap who must have weighed more than twenty stone"
quarter - a quarter of a hundredweight (25 pounds)
2.pound - the basic unit of money in Great Britain and Northern Irelandpound - the basic unit of money in Great Britain and Northern Ireland; equal to 100 pence
British monetary unit - monetary unit in Great Britain
penny - a fractional monetary unit of Ireland and the United Kingdom; equal to one hundredth of a pound
3.pound - a unit of apothecary weight equal to 12 ounces troy
force unit - a unit of measurement of physical force
4.pound - the basic unit of money in Syria; equal to 100 piasters
piaster, piastre - a fractional monetary unit in Egypt and Lebanon and Sudan and Syria
Syrian monetary unit - monetary unit in Syria
5.pound - the basic unit of money in the Sudan; equal to 100 piasters
piaster, piastre - a fractional monetary unit in Egypt and Lebanon and Sudan and Syria
Sudanese monetary unit - monetary unit in the Sudan
6.pound - the basic unit of money in Lebanon; equal to 100 piasters
piaster, piastre - a fractional monetary unit in Egypt and Lebanon and Sudan and Syria
Lebanese monetary unit - monetary unit in Lebanon
7.pound - formerly the basic unit of money in Irelandpound - formerly the basic unit of money in Ireland; equal to 100 pence
penny - a fractional monetary unit of Ireland and the United Kingdom; equal to one hundredth of a pound
Irish monetary unit - monetary unit in Eire
8.pound - the basic unit of money in Egyptpound - the basic unit of money in Egypt; equal to 100 piasters
Egyptian monetary unit - monetary unit in Egypt
piaster, piastre - a fractional monetary unit in Egypt and Lebanon and Sudan and Syria
9.pound - the basic unit of money in Cyprus; equal to 100 cents
Cypriot monetary unit - monetary unit in Cyprus
mil - a Cypriot monetary unit equal to one thousandth of a pound
10.pound - a nontechnical unit of force equal to the mass of 1 pound with an acceleration of free fall equal to 32 feet/sec/sec
force unit - a unit of measurement of physical force
quarter pound - 4 ounces avoirdupois
11.pound - United States writer who lived in EuropePound - United States writer who lived in Europe; strongly influenced the development of modern literature (1885-1972)
12.pound - a symbol for a unit of currency (especially for the pound sterling in Great Britain)
symbol - an arbitrary sign (written or printed) that has acquired a conventional significance
13.pound - a public enclosure for stray or unlicensed dogs; "unlicensed dogs will be taken to the pound"
enclosure - a structure consisting of an area that has been enclosed for some purpose
14.pound - the act of pounding (delivering repeated heavy blows)pound - the act of pounding (delivering repeated heavy blows); "the sudden hammer of fists caught him off guard"; "the pounding of feet on the hallway"
blow - a powerful stroke with the fist or a weapon; "a blow on the head"
Verb1.pound - hit hard with the hand, fist, or some heavy instrument; "the salesman pounded the door knocker"; "a bible-thumping Southern Baptist"
hit - deal a blow to, either with the hand or with an instrument; "He hit her hard in the face"
2.pound - strike or drive against with a heavy impact; "ram the gate with a sledgehammer"; "pound on the door"
thrust - push forcefully; "He thrust his chin forward"
3.pound - move heavily or clumsily; "The heavy man lumbered across the room"
walk - use one's feet to advance; advance by steps; "Walk, don't run!"; "We walked instead of driving"; "She walks with a slight limp"; "The patient cannot walk yet"; "Walk over to the cabinet"
4.pound - move rhythmically; "Her heart was beating fast"
move - move so as to change position, perform a nontranslational motion; "He moved his hand slightly to the right"
pulsate, pulse, throb - expand and contract rhythmically; beat rhythmically; "The baby's heart was pulsating again after the surgeon massaged it"
palpitate, flutter - beat rapidly; "His heart palpitated"
thrash - beat so fast that (the heart's) output starts dropping until (it) does not manage to pump out blood at all
beat - indicate by beating, as with the fingers or drumsticks; "Beat the rhythm"
flap - move noisily; "flags flapped in the strong wind"
5.pound - partition off into compartments; "The locks pound the water of the canal"
partition, partition off - divide into parts, pieces, or sections; "The Arab peninsula was partitioned by the British"
6.pound - shut up or confine in any enclosure or within any bounds or limits; "The prisoners are safely pounded"
restrain, confine, hold - to close within bounds, limit or hold back from movement; "This holds the local until the express passengers change trains"; "About a dozen animals were held inside the stockade"; "The illegal immigrants were held at a detention center"; "The terrorists held the journalists for ransom"
impound, pound - place or shut up in a pound; "pound the cows so they don't stray"
7.pound - place or shut up in a pound; "pound the cows so they don't stray"
restrain, confine, hold - to close within bounds, limit or hold back from movement; "This holds the local until the express passengers change trains"; "About a dozen animals were held inside the stockade"; "The illegal immigrants were held at a detention center"; "The terrorists held the journalists for ransom"
pound up, pound - shut up or confine in any enclosure or within any bounds or limits; "The prisoners are safely pounded"
8.pound - break down and crush by beating, as with a pestle; "pound the roots with a heavy flat stone"
fragment, fragmentise, fragmentize, break up - break or cause to break into pieces; "The plate fragmented"

pound

1
noun enclosure, yard, pen, compound, kennels, corral (chiefly U.S. & Canad.) The dog has been sent to the pound.

pound

2
verb
1. (sometimes with on) beat, strike, hammer, batter, thrash, thump, pelt, clobber (slang), pummel, belabour, beat the living daylights out of He pounded the table with his fist.
2. crush, powder, bruise, bray (dialect), pulverize, comminute (rare) She paused as she pounded the maize grains.
3. pulsate, beat, pulse, throb, palpitate, pitapat I'm sweating and my heart is pounding.
4. (often with out) thump, beat, hammer, bang A group of tribal drummers pounded out an unrelenting beat.
5. stomp, tramp, march, thunder (informal), clomp I pounded up the stairs to my room and slammed the door.

pound

verb
1. To hit heavily and repeatedly with violent blows:
Informal: lambaste.
Slang: clobber.
Idiom: rain blows on.
2. To shape, break, or flatten with repeated blows:
3. To make rhythmic contractions, sounds, or movements:
4. To fix (an idea, for example) in someone's mind by reemphasis and repetition:
noun
1. A sudden sharp, powerful stroke:
Informal: bash, biff, bop, clip, wallop.
Slang: belt, conk, paste.
2. A stroke or blow, especially one that produces a sound:
Translations
جِنِيهجُنيه استرلينيرَطْلزَريبَهيَرْكُض أو يَمْشي بِتَثاقُل
фунт
libramlátitohradatěžce jíttloukat
pundpund sterlingstødetrampe=-internat
puntarusikoidasulkuallastakavarikkoaluetakoa
funta
font
bangahlunkast, hlaupa òunglegakví, réttlemja, hamramylja
ポンド
파운드
aizžogojumsbungātdauzītmārciņasaberzt, sagrūst
lirălivrăpfund
libraroztĺcť
funtlestvica
pund
เงินปอนด์
dövmekgüm güm vurmakhayvan bakım eviİngiliz lirasılibre
đồng bảng

pound

1 [paʊnd]
A. N
1. (= weight) → libra f (= 453,6gr)
half a poundmedia libra
two dollars a pounddos dólares la libra
they sell it by the poundlo venden por libras
to demand one's pound of fleshexigir todo lo que le corresponde a uno IMPERIAL SYSTEM
2. (= money) → libra f
one pound sterlinguna libra esterlina
the pound (Econ) → la libra esterlina
B. CPD pound coin Nmoneda f de una libra
pound note Nbillete m de una libra

pound

2 [paʊnd]
A. VT
1. (strike)
1.1. (with fists) [+ door, table] → aporrear, golpear
he pounded the table with his fistaporreó or golpeó la mesa con el puño
to pound one's fists against sthgolpear algo con los puños
to pound sth to pieces (with one's fists)destrozar algo (a puñetazos or con los puños)
1.2. (with hammer) → martillear; (with other instrument) → golpear
he pounded the stake into the ground with a rockclavó la estaca en la tierra golpeándola con una piedra
to pound sth to pieces (with a hammer)destrozar algo (a martillazos)
they pounded him into a pulp with their stickslo molieron a palos
1.3. [sea, waves] → azotar, batir contra
the waves pounded the boat to pieceslas olas batieron contra el bote hasta destrozarlo
1.4. (Mil) day after day long-range artillery pounded the citydía tras día fuego de artillería de largo alcance cayó sobre la ciudad causando estragos
the bombs pounded the city to rubblelas bombas redujeron la ciudad a escombros
2. (Culin) [+ herbs, spices] → machacar; [+ garlic, mixture] → machacar, majar; [+ meat] → golpear; [+ dough] → trabajar
3. (= thump) [+ piano, typewriter] → aporrear
to pound the beatrondar las calles (como policía)
to pound the pavement(s) (US) → patear las calles
B. VI
1. (= throb, pulsate) [head] → estar a punto de estallar; [heart] → palpitar; [music] → retumbar
the blood pounded in his earspodía oír el pulso de la sangre en los oídos
his heart pounded with fear/joy/excitementel corazón le palpitaba de miedo/de alegría/de emoción
2. (= strike) the sea pounded against or on the rocksel mar azotaba las rocas or batía contra las rocas
somebody began pounding at or on the dooralguien empezó a aporrear la puerta
we listened to the rain pounding on the roofoíamos la lluvia cayendo con fuerza sobre el tejado
3. (= move heavily) he was pounding along the roadcorría con paso pesado or pesadamente por la carretera
to pound up/down the stairssubir/bajar las escaleras con paso pesado or pesadamente
the train pounded pastel tren pasó retumbando
pound out VT + ADV he was pounding out a tune on the pianoaporreaba una canción en el piano
the drums pounded out the good newslos redobles de los tambores lanzaron a los cuatro vientos la buena noticia

pound

3 [paʊnd] N (= enclosure) (for dogs) → perrera f; (for cars) → depósito m de coches

pound

[ˈpaʊnd]
n
(= weight) → livre f (= 453g)
a pound of carrots → une livre de carottes
Her weight was under ninety pounds → Elle pesait moins de quarante et un kilos
half a pound → une demi-livre
half a pound of butter → une demi-livre de beurre
(= money) → livre f
a five-pound note → un billet de cinq livres
How many euros do you get for a pound? → Combien d'euros a-t-on pour une livre? pound coin, pound sign
(for dogs, cats)fourrière f
(for cars)fourrière f
vt
(= beat) [+ table, door, dashboard] → marteler
He pounded the table with his fist → Il martela la table avec son poing.
[wind, waves, rain] → s'abattre sur
The ship was pounded by huge waves
BUT D'énormes vagues battaient le navire.
(= walk) [+ streets, pavements] → battre
to pound the pavement looking for work → battre le pavé à la recherche d'un travail
(= crush) [+ grain, garlic, spices] → piler
(with guns)pilonner
vi
[heart] → cogner dans sa poitrine
My heart was pounding → Mon cœur cognait dans ma poitrine.
my heart pounded with joy → mon cœur me battait de joie, mon cœur battait de joie
her head was pounding → le sang battait dans ses tempes
pound against
vt fus [wind, rain, waves] → battre contre
pound on
vt fus [+ door, table] → frapper à grands coups à
pound out
vt sep [+ tune, song] → martelerpound coin npièce f d'une livre
a pound coin → une pièce d'une livre

pound

1
n
(= weight)˜ Pfund nt; two pounds of appleszwei Pfund Äpfel; by the poundpfundweise; he is making sure he gets his pound of flesher sorgt dafür, dass er bekommt, was ihm zusteht
(= money)Pfund nt; one pound sterlingein Pfund ntSterling; five poundsfünf Pfund; a five-pound noteeine Fünfpfundnote, ein Fünfpfundschein m ? penny

pound

2
vt
(= hammer, strike)hämmern; earth, paving slabsfeststampfen; meatklopfen; doughkneten, schlagen; piano, typewriterhämmern auf (+dat); tablehämmern auf (+acc); door, wallhämmern gegen; (waves, sea) shipschlagen gegen; (guns, shells, bombs) → ununterbrochen beschießen; (troops, artillery) → unter Beschuss haben; to pound the streets (= jog)durch die Straßen joggen; the boxer pounded his opponent with his fistsder Boxer hämmerte mit den Fäusten auf seinen Gegner ein; the ship was pounded by the wavesdie Wellen schlugen gegen das Schiff; the old-style policeman pounding his beatder Polizist alten Stils, der seine Runde abmarschiert
(= pulverize) corn etc(zer)stampfen; drugs, spiceszerstoßen; to pound something to piecesetw klein stampfen; the guns pounded the walls to piecesdie Kanonen zertrümmerten die Mauern; the waves pounded the boat to piecesdie Wellen zertrümmerten das Boot
vi
(= beat)hämmern; (heart)(wild) pochen; (waves, sea)schlagen (on, against gegen); (drums)dröhnen; (engine, steamer, hooves)stampfen; he pounded at or on the door/on the tableer hämmerte an or gegen die Tür/auf den Tisch
(= run heavily)stampfen; (= walk heavily, stamp)stapfen; the sound of pounding feetdas Geräusch stampfender Füße; the messenger pounded up to me and handed me a telegramder Bote stampfte auf mich zu und übergab mir ein Telegramm

pound

3
n (for stray dogs) → städtischer Hundezwinger; (esp Brit: for cars) → Abstellplatz m (für amtlich abgeschleppte Fahrzeuge)

pound

1 [paʊnd] n
a. (weight = 453g, 16 ounces) → libbra
sold by the pound → venduto/a alla libbra
half a pound → mezza libbra
b. (money = 100 pence) → (lira) sterlina
one pound sterling → una sterlina
a ten-pound note → una banconota da dieci sterline

pound

2 [paʊnd]
1. vt (hammer, strike, door, table, person) → picchiare; (piano) → pestare i tasti di; (typewriter) → battere sui tasti di; (subj, sea, waves) → sbattere contro; (guns, bombs) → martellare; (pulverize, drug, spices, nuts) → pestare, polverizzare; (knead, dough) → lavorare
to pound sth to pieces → fare a pezzi qc
to pound sth to a pulp → ridurre qc in poltiglia
2. vi
a. (heart) → battere forte; (drums) → rullare; (sea) → sbattere; (person) to pound at or ondare dei gran colpi a or su; (piano) → pestare i tasti di
b. (run, walk heavily) to pound in/outentrare/uscire a passi pesanti

pound

3 [paʊnd] n (enclosure, for dogs) → canile m municipale; (for cars) → deposito m auto inv (per auto sottoposte a rimozione forzata)

pound1

(paund) noun
1. (also pound sterling. usually abbreviated to $L when written with a number) the standard unit of British currency, 100 (new) pence.
2. (usually abbreviated to lb(s) when written with a number) a measure of weight (0.454 kilograms).

pound2

(paund) noun
an enclosure or pen into which stray animals are put. a dog-pound.

pound3

(paund) verb
1. to hit or strike heavily; to thump. He pounded at the door; The children were pounding on the piano.
2. to walk or run heavily. He pounded down the road.
3. to break up (a substance) into powder or liquid. She pounded the dried herbs.

pound

جِنِيه libra pund Pfund λίρα libra punta livre funta libbra ポンド 파운드 pond pund funt libra фунт pund เงินปอนด์ pound đồng bảng

pound

n. libra, medida de peso;
v. machacar, golpear.

pound (lb)

n libra (lb)
References in classic literature ?
There was likewise a square box of pine-wood, full of soap in bars; also, another of the same size, in which were tallow candles, ten to the pound.
It is true, an old farmer, who had been down to New York on a visit several years after, and from whom this account of the ghostly adventure was received, brought home the intelligence that Ichabod Crane was still alive; that he had left the neighborhood partly through fear of the goblin and Hans Van Ripper, and partly in mortification at having been suddenly dismissed by the heiress; that he had changed his quarters to a distant part of the country; had kept school and studied law at the same time; had been admitted to the bar; turned politician; electioneered; written for the newspapers; and finally had been made a justice of the ten pound court.
Be careful with the butter --twenty cents the pound it was, and mind ye, if-- Come, come, Captain Bildad; stop palavering, --away
No, Stubb; you may pound that knot there as much as you please, but you will never pound into me what you were just now saying.
This was a little joke of John's; he used to say that a regular course of "the Birtwick horseballs" would cure almost any vicious horse; these balls, he said, were made up of patience and gentleness, firmness and petting, one pound of each to be mixed up with half a pint of common sense, and given to the horse every day.
I dropped in there while Marco, the son of Marco, was haggling with a shopkeeper over a quarter of a pound of salt, and asked for change for a twenty-dollar gold piece.
The baby Tom would claw anybody who came within reach of his nails, and pound anybody he could reach with his rattle.
I'll take away the gift I gave And pound her into jelly.
I was thinkin'" answered Ben, "as I'd warrant tha's, gone up three or four pound this week.
I'll pound it, it's wot you do yourself, sir,' said Mr.
I calculated the consequences of replying "Four Hundred Pound," and finding them against me, went as near the answer as I could - which was somewhere about eightpence off.
I'll form a Joint-Stock Company, And turn an honest pound or so.