power of attorney

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Related to powers of attorney: Enduring Power of Attorney

power of attorney

n. pl. powers of attorney Abbr. PA or P/A
1. The authority to act on behalf of a person in certain specified matters, such as financial dealings, or in general.
2. A legal instrument granting such authority.

power of attorney

n
1. (Law) legal authority to act for another person in certain specified matters
2. (Law) the document conferring such authority
Also called: letter of attorney

pow′er of attor′ney


n.
written legal authorization for another person to act in one's place.
[1740–50]

power of attorney

A legal instrument authorizing a person to act as agent for another, especially in financial or legal matters.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.power of attorney - a legal instrument authorizing someone to act as the grantor's agent
legal document, legal instrument, official document, instrument - (law) a document that states some contractual relationship or grants some right
stock power - a power of attorney document to transfer ownership of a registered security from the owner to another party
proxy - a power of attorney document given by shareholders of a corporation authorizing a specific vote on their behalf at a corporate meeting
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
Translations

power of attorney

n (Law) → procura
References in periodicals archive ?
There are several different types of powers of attorney.
While financial and health care durable powers of attorney documents could be combined, it's best to keep these documents separate.
Although powers of attorney are often viewed by the layman as a formalistic issue, they are vital documents and if incorrectly issued (or not issued at all) they may result in a contract or act being declared void.
People often select family members under their powers of attorney for health care and select individuals adept in business matters under their general powers of attorney.
Fortunately, their attorney had prepared durable powers of attorney for health care and financial affairs as well as a living will.
Monica Manor, (1) the Court of Common Pleas of Philadelphia County ruled that a nursing home/rehabilitation facility's contract with a patient, which was signed by one of the powers of attorney, was valid and enforceable but was limited in its application to the patients claims only.
It is possible to grant powers of attorney to a third party to act on your behalf for almost all kinds of transactions.
The Minister for Human Services, Cassy O Connor, today welcomed the tabling of the Powers of Attorney Amendment Bill 2013 and the Guardianship and Administration Amendment Bill 2013 in Parliament, both of which are an initiative of the Elder Abuse Prevention Strategy aimed towards preventing abuse of older Tasmanians.
The "durable" part refers to the fact that it continues even after the patient is incapacitated; other powers of attorney end upon incapacitation (or death).
Chesterman, John, 'Reforming Powers of Attorney Laws' (2010) 84(12) Law Institute Journal 68