powhiri


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powhiri

(ˌpəʊˈfiːrɪ)
n
(Anthropology & Ethnology) NZ a Māori ceremony of welcome, esp to a marae
[Māori]
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References in periodicals archive ?
A brief powhiri, a traditional Maori welcoming ceremony, was led by Mr.
Ransfield has been MC at a number of NZNO AGMs and has led several powhiri for new staff members joining the organisation.
He was then treated to the ceremonial welcome on the lawn in front of Government House which included a Maori greeting, known as a powhiri.
The Magpies were greeted by a traditional Maori Powhiri ceremonial welcome ahead of the first game of their tour at the Forsyth Barr Stadium.
such gus ‏@anguswow wrote: "Kate Middleton's encounter with an Aussie bum in speedos doesn't appear to have upset white media like the powhiri did.
Despite Kate's minor wardrobe malfunction, she was more wrapped up than the 35 Maori dancers who performed the official welcome - or powhiri - one wearing only a thong.
London, April 6 ( ANI ): The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, who are on a three-week tour Down Under with Prince George, will be welcomed on their first stop in Wellington by the topless dancers of Maori powhiri, who have been asked to cover up so that they don't embarrass the royal couple.
The Powhiri is a traditional Maori welcome ceremony," explained our host Mr Berryman, as we lined up outside the Marae in nervous anticipation.
Sam Warburton watches as the Wales squad recieve a traditional Powhiri welcome - an important ceremony in Maori culture - in Porirua, New Zealand yesterday (above); George North wearing a Rugby World Cup 2011 cap during the ceremony (left) and the squad with members of local tribes (below) Shane Williams in action last year against Wales' opening World Cup opponents South Africa
Indigenous representatives of seven countries attending the conference (Norway, Australia, New Zealand, Hawai'i, Mexico, Canada, and the USA) 'pulled' canoes, and a process similar to karanga and powhiri culminated in permission being granted for the conference delegates to stand on Suquamish land.
It is traditionally laid down by outsiders (manuhiri) when visiting the meeting house (marae) of the home people to a particular area (tangata whenua) during a welcome ritual known as a powhiri.