pragmatism

(redirected from pragmatisms)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

prag·ma·tism

 (prăg′mə-tĭz′əm)
n.
1. Philosophy A movement consisting of varying but associated theories, originally developed by Charles S. Peirce and William James and distinguished by the doctrine that the meaning of an idea or a proposition lies in its observable practical consequences.
2. A practical, matter-of-fact way of approaching or assessing situations or of solving problems.

prag′ma·tist n.
prag′ma·tis′tic adj.

pragmatism

(ˈpræɡməˌtɪzəm)
n
1. action or policy dictated by consideration of the immediate practical consequences rather than by theory or dogma
2. (Philosophy) philosophy
a. the doctrine that the content of a concept consists only in its practical applicability
b. the doctrine that truth consists not in correspondence with the facts but in successful coherence with experience. See also instrumentalism
ˈpragmatist n, adj
ˌpragmaˈtistic adj

prag•ma•tism

(ˈpræg məˌtɪz əm)

n.
1. character or conduct that emphasizes practical results or concerns rather than theory or principle.
2. a philosophical movement or system having various forms, but generally stressing practical consequences as constituting the essential criterion in determining meaning, truth, or value.
[1860–65]
prag′ma•tist, n., adj.
prag`ma•tis′tic, adj.

pragmatism

a philosophical system stressing practical consequences and values as standards by which the validity of concepts are to be determined. — pragmatist, n., adj.pragmatistic, adj.
See also: Philosophy

pragmatism

An American philosophical school; the view that the meaning of things is in their practical relation to people.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pragmatism - (philosophy) the doctrine that practical consequences are the criteria of knowledge and meaning and value
instrumentalism - a system of pragmatic philosophy that considers idea to be instruments that should guide our actions and their value is measured by their success
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
2.pragmatism - the attribute of accepting the facts of life and favoring practicality and literal truth
practicality - concerned with actual use rather than theoretical possibilities
Translations
pragmatisme
pragmatismo

pragmatism

[ˈprægmətɪzəm] Npragmatismo m

pragmatism

[ˈprægmətɪzəm] npragmatisme m

pragmatism

nPragmatismus m

pragmatism

[ˈprægməˌtɪzm] npragmatismo
References in periodicals archive ?
Arthur Lovejoy, "The Thirteen Pragmatisms," in Arthur Lovejoy, Thirteen Pragmatisms and Other Essays (Baltimore, MD: John Hopkins University Press, 1963), pp.
As such, Swindal's "Introduction" and "Chapter 1" would work quite well in both undergraduate and graduate courses where an overview of the contemporary scene of pragmatism and action would be relevant.
He had not satisfaction of William James method, pragmatism theorist and changed his theory name from pragmatism to pragmatisms in 1905.
This study aims to present insight in idealism and pragmatism and consider in this problem.
But there are many ways in which philosophy can be connected to practice, resulting in the very different pragmatisms of Peirce, James, Dewey, Quine, Rorty, and other influential thinkers.
Nicholas Rescher's latest book on pragmatism is an excellent guide through the complexities of this important philosophical movement.
Menand of course acknowledges important variations among the pragmatisms of Holmes, James, Peirce, and Dewey, and delves thoughtfully into them.
His perspectives are classical American pragmatism, pragmatics and pragmatisms, a Kantian rationalist pragmatism, an arc of thought from Rorty's eliminative materialism to his pragmatism, synthesizing naturalism and historicism, toward an analytic pragmatism, and expressivism and anti-representationalism.
Pragmatism returned, after decades of neglect, to the focus of philosophical discussion in the 1970-80s, largely thanks to its most famous contemporary proponent, Richard Rorty, who died in 2007.