pragmatism

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prag·ma·tism

(prăg′mə-tĭz′əm)
n.
1. Philosophy A movement consisting of varying but associated theories, originally developed by Charles S. Peirce and William James and distinguished by the doctrine that the meaning or truth value of an idea or a proposition lies in its observable practical consequences.
2. A practical, matter-of-fact way of approaching or assessing situations or of solving problems.

prag′ma·tist n.
prag′ma·tis′tic adj.

pragmatism

(ˈpræɡməˌtɪzəm)
n
1. action or policy dictated by consideration of the immediate practical consequences rather than by theory or dogma
2. (Philosophy) philosophy
a. the doctrine that the content of a concept consists only in its practical applicability
b. the doctrine that truth consists not in correspondence with the facts but in successful coherence with experience. See also instrumentalism
ˈpragmatist n, adj
ˌpragmaˈtistic adj

prag•ma•tism

(ˈpræg məˌtɪz əm)

n.
1. character or conduct that emphasizes practical results or concerns rather than theory or principle.
2. a philosophical movement or system having various forms, but generally stressing practical consequences as constituting the essential criterion in determining meaning, truth, or value.
[1860–65]
prag′ma•tist, n., adj.
prag`ma•tis′tic, adj.

pragmatism

a philosophical system stressing practical consequences and values as standards by which the validity of concepts are to be determined. — pragmatist, n., adj.pragmatistic, adj.
See also: Philosophy

pragmatism

An American philosophical school; the view that the meaning of things is in their practical relation to people.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pragmatism - (philosophy) the doctrine that practical consequences are the criteria of knowledge and meaning and value
instrumentalism - a system of pragmatic philosophy that considers idea to be instruments that should guide our actions and their value is measured by their success
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
2.pragmatism - the attribute of accepting the facts of life and favoring practicality and literal truth
practicality - concerned with actual use rather than theoretical possibilities
Translations
pragmatisme
pragmatismo

pragmatism

[ˈprægmətɪzəm] Npragmatismo m

pragmatism

[ˈprægmətɪzəm] npragmatisme m

pragmatism

nPragmatismus m

pragmatism

[ˈprægməˌtɪzm] npragmatismo
References in periodicals archive ?
1) Floridi se refiere a la edicion de Etica & Politica/Ethics & Politics, 13 (2): 304-310, julio-diciembre 2011, en la que se publican las ponencias de Gustavo Cevolani (Verisimilitude and strongly semantic information), Massimo Durante (Normativity, Constructionism, and Constraining Affordances), Don Fallis (Floridi on Disinformation), David Gamez (Information and Consciousness), Jacob Krebs (Philosophy of Information and Pragmatistic Understanding of Information), Marty J.
The other two pieces are largely pragmatistic, quantitative, and statistical exercises, leaving the reader with little more than an impression of hardworking medieval synonymy and a dusty, faintly repellent taste in the mouth.
Ought not the existence of the various types of thinking which we have reviewed, each so splendid for certain purposes, yet all conflicting still, and neither one of them able to support a claim of absolute veracity, to awaken a presumption favorable to the pragmatistic view that all our theories are instrumental, are mental modes of adaptation to reality, rather than revelations or gnostic answers to some divinely instituted world-enigma?