pre-Christian


Also found in: Wikipedia.

pre-Chris·tian

(prē-krĭs′chən)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or being the time before the beginning of the Christian era.
2. Of, relating to, or being the time in the history of a people or region before its conversion to Christianity or the beginning of Christian influence on it.

pre-Christian

adj
(Historical Terms) of or referring to the period of history prior to the establishment of Christianity

pre-Chris•tian

(priˈkrɪs tʃən)

adj.
of, pertaining to, or belonging to a time or period before the Christian Era.
[1820–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.pre-Christian - of or relating to or being the time before the beginning of the Christian era
Translations

pre-Christian

[priːˈkrɪstʃən] ADJprecristiano

pre-Christian

References in periodicals archive ?
amp;nbsp;The Easter bunny has its origins in pre-Christian fertility lore and serves as symbols of abundant new life in the spring season.
They explore three distinct areas--the Celtic world of Ireland and Wales, the Norse world, and the world of Anglo-Saxon England--in which a pre-Christian past lived on in the literature after the adoption of Christianity.
In that process, religion became a tangible product that served as a gift bestowed by leaders to their followers in parallel symmetry to the gift exchanges of pre-Christian pagan society as a way of securing and maintaining loyalty.
In pre-Christian Egypt , wicked En Sabah Nur (Oscar Isaac) is buried in a collapsed pyramid.
6(SUNA)- A Specialized Mission affiliated to Department of Archaeology of Faculty of Arts in Khartoum University, has explored important archaeological discoveries of mass grave dated back to pre-Christian era and a castle at Al-Khandaq area, Al-Golid Locality, Northern State.
Many years after college, I came across stories of ancient pre-Christian beliefs in dying and resurrecting gods whose lives paralleled in almost every detail the life of Jesus Christ.
Drawing on Heidegger's ideas about Being, Van Heekeren argues that these stories collectively constitute a 'container' of Vula'a identity, while also serving as the basis of a local project to preserve pre-Christian Vula'a traditions, language, and practice.
The stakes rise when another nun is slain, and then another, in ways that suggest a continuing series of sacrifices to the pre-Christian gods of Ireland.
Pagan Magic of the Northern Tradition: Customs, Rites, and Ceremonies discusses magic in pre-Christian societies of Northern Europe, and how people believed in magic because it not only seemed to explain how the world worked, but it was part of their daily lives.
For instance, King Lear takes place in a pre-Christian Britain.
Others may look it up and learn that a demiurge, in some pre-Christian cosmologies, was a kind of subordinate divinity Context is crucial, and the philosophers who speculated about demiurges were the heirs of polytheists.
We therefore expected pre-Christian elements to survive in Baltic folklore for much longer than in Dutch folklore.