pre-Roman

pre-Roman

adj
(Historical Terms) of or relating to the period before the founding of ancient Rome
References in periodicals archive ?
This pottery type is common in early tarand graves, and Lang confidently dated the sherd in question to the Late Pre-Roman Iron Age through the Roman Iron Age.
The first volume of this two-volume set presents eight integrated chapters offering introductory material followed by discussion of pre-Roman topography and time periods through the late fourth century AD, when decline and Roman abandonment occurred.
We want to explore the idea of building a pre-Roman Celtic roundhouse, which would show what the landscape had been like, and would also give a bit of covered space on the site .
These sites were attacked: Tacitus mentions Vespasian's reduction of such sites, in what is now the west of England, and recent work has shown pre-Roman attacks on such sites.
Descended from pre-Roman cattle, our black beef produce a meat which belies their hardy constitutions.
Yes, the ramparts were finally destroyed by fire in around 415 BC which is both pre-Roman and Iron Age, but the latest, post-Varley investigations have taken back the earliest activity on the site to around 2700 BC which is late Stone Age and before the pyramids were built and before any stones were erected at Stonehenge.
30pm Park rangers will guide visitors on a ramble, looking at some of the archaeology - from pre-roman Britain to the Second World War.
Kids will also love a trip on the historic Dean Forest Railway and a visit to Puzzle Wood - home to pre-Roman open cast iron workings and a secret maze.
The word 'Celt' was only used to describe the pre-Roman inhabitants of our islands in the 18th century.
This research has in turn profoundly affected our understanding of Roman, pre-Roman and early Anglo-Saxon history.
If architecture is interpreted in strictly biographical terms, the Kursaal -- as a special fragment in the city -- is clearly indebted to Moneos pre-Roman experience, to the two years he spent working for the Danish master J[phi]rn Utzon.
It was the capital of the Nabataeans, who dominated the area in pre-Roman times and cut hundreds of stunning buildings from sandstone.