pre-echo

(redirected from pre-echoes)

pre-echo

(priːˈɛkəʊ)
n
1. something that has preceded and anticipated something else; precursor
2. (Electronics) a fault in an audio recording in which a sound that is to come is heard too early: on tape sometimes caused by print-through
References in periodicals archive ?
Consequently, he has here quite different intentions: to describe the context in which the album had its origins, to offer the reader his own musical insights into the album, and, for the largest part of the book, to "find connections, identify direct influences, tease out correspondences and locate interesting pre-echoes and intriguing coincidences.
Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition, welcomely without any pre-echoes of Ravel's subsequent orchestral colourings, emerges as impatient and too easy, with little sense of the music's inherent wistfulness.
His 6th symphony and overture, The Bride of Messina, contains pre-echoes of Brahms, as well as post-echoes of Mendelssohn and only the lack of memorable tunes has probably prevented the success of his own time being reflected today.
The concert opened with Northern Sinfonia's 18 solo strings in Britten's Prelude and Fugue, which should be heard more often - astonishing how the coda pre-echoes the string sound used by many contemporary composers - and the second half opened with Bach's Third Orchestral Suite.
Egoyan thinks it might be longer than the prop they're using, so it pre-echoes more the sword Sieglinde later shows Siegmund to try to save his life in the climactic fight of Act II.
There are pre-echoes of Henry V 'petty dukedoms' suggests 'petty and unprofitable dukedoms' (3 Chorus 31).
The spirit of Bach hung heavily over much of his programme - a first half of fantasias, followed after the interval by sonatas - from JSB's own Fantasia and Fugue in G minor, via Bachian pre-echoes by Froberger and Buxtehude, to Reger's mighty homage work, the Fantasia and Fugue on Bach.
Next came the compact beauty of Webern's Six Bagatelles for String Quartet of 1913, delicate song-like pre-echoes of the 12-tone system.
Directly influenced by a touring production of Wagner's Ring which Rimsky-Korsakov had heard in 1889, the score also contains pre-echoes of Stravinsky, whose father, a singer at the Mariinsky Theatre, took part in the first performance.