preambulatory

preambulatory

(ˌpriːæɛmbjʊˈleɪtərɪ)
adj
another word for preambulary
References in periodicals archive ?
Perhaps due to the unusual nature of this bill, the legislation's preambulatory clauses offer a wide-ranging justification for such an alliance, using political, historical, and even biblical appeals.
In its preambulatory material, the bill claims that "today a large majority of Crow tribal members are Christians," highlights two Crow-language names for Jesus, and draws attention to an informal policy of offering prayers before legislative sessions, "all of which are typically done in the name of Jesus.
Notwithstanding the very positive aspects of what was achieved at Kampala and the efforts that are currently underway to fulfill its promise of early activation of ICC jurisdiction over aggression, the delay in activating such jurisdiction is hard to reconcile with the Rome Statute's preambulatory language, which cites a determination to end impunity for such crimes.
The Brigance Inventory of Early Development (IED-II), an assessment for children with a developmental age between 0 and 7 years, measures children's performance on more than 200 skills within the following major developmental domains: self-help, preambulatory motor, gross motor, fine motor, speech/language, social/emotional development, general knowledge and comprehension, academic readiness, basic reading skills, basic mathematics, and manuscript (Black, 2004).
Mobilization was graded as sitting in bed, sitting on the edge of the bed, standing and preambulatory exercises and ambulation.
Justice Breyer contends that the preambulatory "We" refers to people today.