preboard

(redirected from preboarding)

pre·board

 (prē′bôrd′)
v. pre·board·ed, pre·board·ing, pre·boards
v.tr.
1. To board (an aircraft, for example) ahead of the regular time or before other passengers.
2. To allow (one or more passengers) to board ahead of the regular time or before other passengers.
v.intr.
To board an aircraft or other conveyance ahead of the regular time or before other passengers.

preboard

(priːˈbɔːd)
vb
1. to (allow to) board a plane before other passengers
2. (Clothing & Fashion) (tr) to set the shape of (a garment, esp stockings) using heat, so that it will not lose its shape during washing

pre•board

(priˈbɔrd, -ˈboʊrd)

v.t., v.i.
to board before the usual time or before others.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
And take advantage of preboarding to make things go smoother.
United Airlines joined the likes of American Airlines when it recently nixed the perk of preboarding for those flying with children.
But officials are hopeful that the new technology ultimately will become the primary preboarding security check device.
Preboarding, in essence, is cloning your high-value customers--so your bank not only acquires more profitable and loyal customers, but also increases your customers' lifetime value and aids retention
The 13 papers separately examine issues associated with the preboarding stage of the security process, the in-flight layer, new technologies, and policy options.
The pets are also given preboarding walks and bathroom breaks.
A party of nine preboarding and sitting in all the first-class seats because they had never flown before and thought it was "first come, first served.
For overseas visitors Luxury Belfast helps them arrive in style with BMI, with lounge access, preboarding, complimentary drinks and catering and luxury business class travel.
For example, individuals often board commuter and Amtrak trains without showing or even obtaining tickets beforehand; little screening is done prior to boarding (although there is experimentation with preboarding screening at selected rail stations).
Travelers after 9-11 who realized that "random" preboarding inspections were actually more likely to target the first people in line are given as an example; these travelers have now dropped toward the back of the line to avoid these checks.
Also new is the preboarding area, as guests step inside the soundstage that holds the E.