precept


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pre·cept

 (prē′sĕpt′)
n.
1. A rule or principle prescribing a particular course of action or conduct.
2. Law A direction or order issued by an authority; a writ, command, or process.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin praeceptum, from neuter past participle of praecipere, to advise, teach : prae-, pre- + capere, to take; see kap- in Indo-European roots.]

precept

(ˈpriːsɛpt)
n
1. a rule or principle for action
2. a guide or rule for morals; maxim
3. a direction, esp for a technical operation
4. (Law) law
a. a writ or warrant
b. a written order to a sheriff to arrange an election, the empanelling of a jury, etc
c. (in England) an order to collect money under a rate
[C14: from Latin praeceptum maxim, injunction, from praecipere to admonish, from prae before + capere to take]

pre•cept

(ˈpri sɛpt)

n.
1. a commandment or direction given as a rule of action or conduct.
2. an injunction as to moral conduct; maxim.
3. a direction for performing a technical operation.
4. Law. a written order issued pursuant to law.
[Middle English < Latin praeceptum piece of advice, rule, n. use of neuter of praeceptus, past participle of praecipere to direct, foresee]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.precept - rule of personal conduct
prescript, rule - prescribed guide for conduct or action
higher law - a principle that takes precedent over the laws of society
moral principle - the principle that conduct should be moral
hypothetical imperative - a principle stating the action required to attain a desired goal
ethical code, ethic - a system of principles governing morality and acceptable conduct
caveat emptor - a commercial principle that without a warranty the buyer takes upon himself the risk of quality
2.precept - a doctrine that is taught; "the teachings of religion"; "he believed all the Christian precepts"
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
Golden Rule - a command based on Jesus' words in the Sermon on the Mount; "Whatsoever ye would that men do unto you, do you even so unto them" (Matthew 7:12)
mitsvah, mitzvah - (Judaism) a precept or commandment of the Jewish law

precept

noun
2. maxim, saying, rule, principle, guideline, motto, dictum, axiom, byword the precept, `If a job's worth doing, it's worth doing well'

precept

noun
A principle governing affairs within or among political units:
Translations
ohjeohjenuorasääntö
gedragsregelprinciperegel

precept

[ˈpriːsept] Nprecepto m

precept

[ˈpriːsɛpt] nprécepte m

precept

nGrundsatz m, → Prinzip nt

precept

[ˈpriːsɛpt] nprecetto
References in classic literature ?
It is true, that if the affection or aptness of the children be extraordinary, then it is good not to cross it; but generally the precept is good, optimum elige, suave et facile illud faciet consuetudo.
He did not hesitate to omit the proofs of these, and so far to make himself not only a precept, but an example in criticism.
First, it is likely that before the rise of the Ionian epos there existed in Boeotia a purely popular and indigenous poetry of a crude form: it comprised, we may suppose, versified proverbs and precepts relating to life in general, agricultural maxims, weather-lore, and the like.
Of the three precepts of Freemasonry Pierre realized that he did not fulfill the one which enjoined every Mason to set an example of moral life, and that of the seven virtues he lacked two- morality and the love of death.
Tom Jones, on the other hand, was not only deficient in outward tokens of respect, often forgetting to pull off his hat, or to bow at his master's approach; but was altogether as unmindful both of his master's precepts and example.
He thought, indeed, that the different exuberancies of these gentlemen would correct their different imperfections; and that from both, especially with his assistance, the two lads would derive sufficient precepts of true religion and virtue.
They who set themselves to give precepts must of course regard themselves as possessed of greater skill than those to whom they prescribe; and if they err in the slightest particular, they subject themselves to censure.
Let us suppose an inhabitant of some remote and superior region, yet unskilled in the ways of men, having read and considered the precepts of the gospel, and the example of our Saviour, to come down in search of the true church: if he would not inquire after it among the cruel, the insolent, and the oppressive; among those who are continually grasping at dominion over souls as well as bodies; among those who are employed in procuring to themselves impunity for the most enormous villainies, and studying methods of destroying their fellow-creatures, not for their crimes but their errors; if he would not expect to meet benevolence, engage in massacres, or to find mercy in a court of inquisition, he would not look for the true church in the Church of Rome.
The married couple ought also to regard the precepts of physicians and naturalists, each of whom have treated on these [1335b] subjects.
WEST Midlands Mayor Andy Street's plan for a PS10-a-year precept to council tax bills is set to be scrapped for at least a year.
WEST Midlands Mayor Andy Street's plan to add a PS10-a-year precept to council tax bills is set to be scrapped for at least a year.
Local council leaders and the mayor will consider a proposal on Friday to "defer" the precept, so that it's not included in this year's Council Tax bills.