precession


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to precession: precession of the equinoxes, Orbital precession

pre·ces·sion

 (prē-sĕsh′ən)
n.
1. The act or state of preceding; precedence.
2. Physics The motion of the axis of a spinning body, such as the wobble of a spinning top, when there is an external force acting on the axis.
3. Astronomy
a. Precession of the equinoxes.
b. A slow gyration of the earth's rotational axis around the pole of the ecliptic, caused by the gravitational pull of the sun, moon, and other planets on the earth's equatorial bulge.

[Late Latin praecessiō, praecessiōn-, from Latin praecessus, past participle of praecēdere, to go before; see precede.]

pre·ces′sion·al adj.

precession

(prɪˈsɛʃən)
n
1. the act of preceding
2. (Astronomy) See precession of the equinoxes
3. (General Physics) the motion of a spinning body, such as a top, gyroscope, or planet, in which it wobbles so that the axis of rotation sweeps out a cone
[C16: from Late Latin praecessiō a going in advance, from Latin praecēdere to precede]
preˈcessional adj
preˈcessionally adv

pre•ces•sion

(priˈsɛʃ ən)

n.
1. the act or fact of preceding; precedence.
2. the movement of the axis of rotation of a spinning body around another axis, outside the body and at an angle to it: an effect exhibited by a spinning top or gyroscope.
3. the slow, conical motion of the earth's axis of rotation caused by forces exerted on the earth by the sun and moon and responsible for the precession of the equinoxes.
[1300–50; < Late Latin praecessiō a going before, advance, derivative (with -tiō -tion) of praecēdere to precede]
pre•ces′sion•al, adj.

pre·ces·sion

(prē-sĕsh′ən)
1. The motion of the axis of a spinning body, such as the wobbling of a spinning top, that arises when an external force acts on the axis.
2. The motion of this kind made by the Earth's axis, caused mainly by the gravitational pull of the sun, moon, and other planets. ♦ The precession of the equinoxes is the slow westward shift of the autumnal and vernal equinoxes along the ecliptic, resulting from precession of the Earth's axis. A complete precession of the equinoxes takes 25,800 years.

precession

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Switch to new thesaurus
Noun1.precession - the motion of a spinning body (as a top) in which it wobbles so that the axis of rotation sweeps out a cone
motion - a state of change; "they were in a state of steady motion"
2.precession - the act of preceding in time or order or rank (as in a ceremony)
activity - any specific behavior; "they avoided all recreational activity"
Translations

precession

nPräzession f; precession of the equinoxes (Astron) → Präzession fder Äquinoktien
References in classic literature ?
He was a stern, gaunt man, with a harsh voice, and an aggressive manner, but he had the merit of knowing how to assimilate the ideas of other men, and to pass them on in a way which was intelligible and even interesting to the lay public, with a happy knack of being funny about the most unlikely objects, so that the precession of the Equinox or the formation of a vertebrate became a highly humorous process as treated by him.
Another finds that the phenomena of precession and nutation require that the earth, if not entirely solid, must at least have a shell not less than eight hundred to a thousand miles in thickness.
The present discrepancies in the subcritical visibilities suggest there exists some cause of additional precession phase distribution broadening in the tunnelling transmission not considered in the present simulations and induced the measured visibility decrease after the superpositions over the phase distributions in the measuring process.
To investigate the question Muller and Schafer chose two physical effects at extreme ends of the range of our perception, the Lamb shift in atomic hydrogen and the precession of planetary orbits.
The inclusion of precession in waveform models is the most challenging and urgent theoretical problem in the build-up to GW astronomy.
1]) is the angular precession rate of the neutron spin in a magnetic field.
One idea, called the Milankovitch theory, pins the responsibility on periodic changes in the earth's orbit, which alter the amount of solar radiation received by the planet; variations in the eccentricity, tilt and precession of the earth are thought to drive climate cycles at intervals of roughly 100,000, 1,000 and 23,000 years.
By tuning an oscillating high-frequency magnetic field to the natural precession frequency of the spin being imaged, its magnetic orientation flips back and forth as the cantilever vibrates.
In the absence of any coupling between the electron spins and the rest of the crystal environment, the precession would continue indefinitely.
Precession of the orbit of the planet MErcury determined the superiority of Einsterin's theory over Newton's.
It will enable the novice to control the system to full extent, yet allow experts to take full advantage of all features, including comprehensive support of twinned samples, enhanced 2D & 3D visualisation, precession photographs, XML and LIMS compatibility for trouble-free bio-informatics, FFT indexing from single exposures and an automatic strategy organizer.
Like electron paramagnetic resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance, FMR involves precession of the magnetization around an equilibrium direction, but motion of the magnetization is heavily influenced by the large magnetization that is characteristic of ferromagnets.