precipitate


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pre·cip·i·tate

 (prĭ-sĭp′ĭ-tāt′)
v. pre·cip·i·tat·ed, pre·cip·i·tat·ing, pre·cip·i·tates
v.tr.
1. To cause to happen, especially suddenly or prematurely: an announcement that precipitated a political crisis.
2. To cause to fall down from a height; hurl downward: "The finest bridge in all Peru broke and precipitated five travelers into the gulf below" (Thornton Wilder).
3. To put suddenly into a certain state or condition: "He was like a man who had never known liberty and was all at once precipitated into it" (Taylor Caldwell).
4. Meteorology To cause (a form of water, as rain or snow) to fall from the air.
5. Chemistry To cause (a solid substance) to be separated from a solution.
v.intr.
1. Meteorology To fall from the air as a form of water, such as rain or snow.
2. Chemistry To be separated from a solution as a solid.
adj. (-tĭt)
1. Moving rapidly and heedlessly; speeding headlong.
2. Acting with or marked by excessive haste and lack of due deliberation. See Synonyms at impetuous.
3. Occurring suddenly or unexpectedly.
n. (-tāt′, -tĭt)
1. Chemistry A solid or solid phase separated from a solution.
2. A product resulting from a process, event, or course of action.

[Latin praecipitāre, praecipitāt-, to throw headlong, from praeceps, praecipit-, headlong : prae-, pre- + caput, capit-, head; see kaput- in Indo-European roots.]

pre·cip′i·tate·ly (-tĭt-lē) adv.
pre·cip′i·tate·ness n.
pre·cip′i·ta′tive adj.
pre·cip′i·ta′tor n.
Usage Note: The adjective precipitate and the adverb precipitately were once applied to physical steepness but are now used primarily of rash, headlong actions: Their precipitate entry into the foreign markets led to disaster. He withdrew precipitately from the race. Precipitous currently means "steep" in both literal and figurative senses: the precipitous rapids of the upper river; a precipitous drop in commodity prices. But precipitous and precipitously are also frequently used to mean "abrupt, hasty," which takes them into territory that would ordinarily belong to precipitate and precipitately: their precipitous decision to leave. Many people object to this usage out of a desire to keep precipitate and precipitous distinct, but the extension of meaning from "steep" to "abrupt" is perfectly natural. After all a precipitous increase in reports of measles is also an abrupt or sudden event. In fact, a majority of the Usage Panel now accepts this usage. In our 2004 survey, 65 percent accepted the sentence Pressure to marry may cause precipitous decision-making that is not grounded in the reality of who you are and what you want from life.

precipitate

vb
1. (tr) to cause to happen too soon or sooner than expected; bring on
2. to throw or fall from or as from a height
3. (Physical Geography) to cause (moisture) to condense and fall as snow, rain, etc, or (of moisture, rain, etc) to condense and fall thus
4. (Chemistry) chem to undergo or cause to undergo a process in which a dissolved substance separates from solution as a fine suspension of solid particles
adj
5. rushing ahead
6. done rashly or with undue haste
7. sudden and brief
n
(Chemistry) chem a precipitated solid in its suspended form or after settling or filtering
[C16: from Latin praecipitāre to throw down headlong, from praeceps headlong, steep, from prae before, in front + caput head]
preˈcipitable adj
preˌcipitaˈbility n
preˈcipitately adv
preˈcipitateness n
preˈcipitative adj
preˈcipiˌtator n

pre•cip•i•tate

(v. prɪˈsɪp ɪˌteɪt; adj., n. -tɪt, -ˌteɪt)

v. -tat•ed, -tat•ing,
adj., n. v.t.
1. to hasten the occurrence of; bring about prematurely or suddenly: to precipitate a crisis.
2. to fling or hurl down.
3. to cast violently or abruptly: to precipitate oneself into a struggle.
4. to separate (a substance) in solid form from a solution, as by means of a reagent.
v.i.
5. to fall to the earth's surface as a condensed form of water; to rain, snow, hail, drizzle, etc.
6. to separate from a solution as a precipitate.
7. to be cast down headlong.
adj.
8. done or made without sufficient deliberation; overhasty; rash: a precipitate marriage.
9. rushing or falling headlong.
10. proceeding rapidly or with great haste: a precipitate retreat.
11. exceedingly sudden or abrupt.
n.
12. a substance precipitated from a solution.
13. moisture condensed in the form of rain, snow, etc.
[1520–30; < Latin praecipitātus, past participle of praecipitāre to hurl down, cause to fall, v. derivative of praeceps, s. praecipit- (see precipice, -ate1)]
pre•cip′i•tate•ly, adv.
pre•cip′i•tate•ness, n.
pre•cip′i•ta`tive, adj.
pre•cip′i•ta`tor, n.

pre·cip·i·tate

(prĭ-sĭp′ĭ-tāt′)
Verb
1. To cause water vapor to condense from the atmosphere and fall as rain or snow.
2. To separate chemically from a solution in the form of a solid.
Noun
A solid material separated from a solution by chemical means: an insoluble precipitate.
precipitous, precipitate - Precipitous, "hasty, sudden and dramatic," is used in relation to physical or natural objects; precipitate, "done with great haste," relates to human actions or processes.
See also related terms for hasty.

precipitate

, precipitation - Precipitate is from Latin praecipitare, "to throw or drive headlong"; precipitation first meant the action of falling or throwing down.
See also related terms for throwing.

precipitate


Past participle: precipitated
Gerund: precipitating

Imperative
precipitate
precipitate
Present
I precipitate
you precipitate
he/she/it precipitates
we precipitate
you precipitate
they precipitate
Preterite
I precipitated
you precipitated
he/she/it precipitated
we precipitated
you precipitated
they precipitated
Present Continuous
I am precipitating
you are precipitating
he/she/it is precipitating
we are precipitating
you are precipitating
they are precipitating
Present Perfect
I have precipitated
you have precipitated
he/she/it has precipitated
we have precipitated
you have precipitated
they have precipitated
Past Continuous
I was precipitating
you were precipitating
he/she/it was precipitating
we were precipitating
you were precipitating
they were precipitating
Past Perfect
I had precipitated
you had precipitated
he/she/it had precipitated
we had precipitated
you had precipitated
they had precipitated
Future
I will precipitate
you will precipitate
he/she/it will precipitate
we will precipitate
you will precipitate
they will precipitate
Future Perfect
I will have precipitated
you will have precipitated
he/she/it will have precipitated
we will have precipitated
you will have precipitated
they will have precipitated
Future Continuous
I will be precipitating
you will be precipitating
he/she/it will be precipitating
we will be precipitating
you will be precipitating
they will be precipitating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been precipitating
you have been precipitating
he/she/it has been precipitating
we have been precipitating
you have been precipitating
they have been precipitating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been precipitating
you will have been precipitating
he/she/it will have been precipitating
we will have been precipitating
you will have been precipitating
they will have been precipitating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been precipitating
you had been precipitating
he/she/it had been precipitating
we had been precipitating
you had been precipitating
they had been precipitating
Conditional
I would precipitate
you would precipitate
he/she/it would precipitate
we would precipitate
you would precipitate
they would precipitate
Past Conditional
I would have precipitated
you would have precipitated
he/she/it would have precipitated
we would have precipitated
you would have precipitated
they would have precipitated

precipitate

An insoluble substance formed by a chemical reaction.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.precipitate - a precipitated solid substance in suspension or after settling or filteringprecipitate - a precipitated solid substance in suspension or after settling or filtering
sludge - the precipitate produced by sewage treatment
solid - matter that is solid at room temperature and pressure
Verb1.precipitate - bring about abruptly; "The crisis precipitated by Russia's revolution"
effect, effectuate, set up - produce; "The scientists set up a shock wave"
2.precipitate - separate as a fine suspension of solid particles
change state, turn - undergo a transformation or a change of position or action; "We turned from Socialism to Capitalism"; "The people turned against the President when he stole the election"
3.precipitate - fall from clouds; "rain, snow and sleet were falling"; "Vesuvius precipitated its fiery, destructive rage on Herculaneum"
fall - descend in free fall under the influence of gravity; "The branch fell from the tree"; "The unfortunate hiker fell into a crevasse"
rain, rain down - precipitate as rain; "If it rains much more, we can expect some flooding"
spat - come down like raindrops; "Bullets were spatting down on us"
snow - fall as snow; "It was snowing all night"
hail - precipitate as small ice particles; "It hailed for an hour"
sleet - precipitate as a mixture of rain and snow; "If the temperature rises above freezing, it will probably sleet"
4.precipitate - fall vertically, sharply, or headlong; "Our economy precipitated into complete ruin"
come down, descend, go down, fall - move downward and lower, but not necessarily all the way; "The temperature is going down"; "The barometer is falling"; "The curtain fell on the diva"; "Her hand went up and then fell again"
5.precipitate - hurl or throw violently; "The bridge broke and precipitated the train into the river below"
hurl, hurtle, cast - throw forcefully
Adj.1.precipitate - done with very great haste and without due deliberation; "hasty marriage seldom proveth well"- Shakespeare; "hasty makeshifts take the place of planning"- Arthur Geddes; "rejected what was regarded as an overhasty plan for reconversion"; "wondered whether they had been rather precipitate in deposing the king"
hurried - moving rapidly or performed quickly or in great haste; "a hurried trip to the store"; "the hurried life of a city"; "a hurried job"

precipitate

verb
1. quicken, trigger, accelerate, further, press, advance, hurry, dispatch, speed up, bring on, hasten, push forward, expedite The killings in the city have precipitated the worst crisis yet.
2. throw, launch, cast, discharge, hurl, fling, let fly, send forth Dust was precipitated into the air.
adjective
1. hasty, hurried, frantic, rash, reckless, impulsive, madcap, ill-advised, precipitous, impetuous, indiscreet, heedless, harum-scarum I don't think we should make any precipitate decisions.
2. sudden, quick, brief, rushing, violent, plunging, rapid, unexpected, swift, abrupt, without warning, headlong, breakneck the precipitate collapse of European communism

precipitate

verb
To put down, especially in layers, by a natural process:
adjective
2. Happening quickly and without warning:
noun
1. Matter that settles on a bottom or collects on a surface by a natural process:
deposit, dreg (often used in plural), lees, precipitation, sediment.
Translations
مادّة مُتَرَسِّبَه
sraženinausazenina
bundfald
äkkijyrkkähätäinenjouduttaakiihdyttääkiirehtiä
botnfall
kritulių kiekis
nogulsnes

precipitate

A. [prɪˈsɪpɪtɪt] ADJprecipitado, apresurado
B. [prɪˈsɪpɪteɪt] VT
1. (= bring on) → precipitar, provocar
an illness precipitated by stressuna enfermedad provocada por el estrés
the decision precipitated her resignationla decisión precipitó su dimisión
2. (= hurl) → lanzar
the civil war precipitated the country into chaosla guerra civil sumió al país en el caos
3. (Chem) → precipitar (Met) → condensar
C. VI [prɪˈsɪpɪteɪt] (Chem) → precipitarse (Met) → condensarse
D. [prɪˈsɪpɪtɪt] N (Chem) → precipitado m

precipitate

[prɪˈsɪpɪtət]
adj (= hasty) → précipité(e)
[prɪˈsɪpɪteɪt] vt [+ crisis, disaster] → précipiter

precipitate

n (Met) → Niederschlag m; (Chem also) → Präzipitat nt (spec)
adj (= hasty)hastig, eilig; (= over-hasty)übereilt, voreilig, überstürzt
vt
(= hurl)schleudern; (downwards) → hinunter- or hinabschleudern; (fig)stürzen
(= hasten)beschleunigen
(Chem) → (aus)fällen; (Met) → niederschlagen
vi (Chem) → ausfallen; (Met) → sich niederschlagen

precipitate

[adj, n prɪˈsɪpɪtɪt; vb prɪˈsɪpɪteɪt]
1. adj (hasty) → precipitoso/a, affrettato/a
2. n (Chem) → precipitato
3. vt
a. (bring on, crisis) → accelerare
b. (Chem) → precipitare (Met) → far condensare

precipitate

(priˈsipiteit) noun
the substance that settles at the bottom of a liquid.
precipitation noun
the amount of rain or snow that falls on the ground.

pre·cip·i·tate

n. precipitado, depósito de partes sólidas que se asientan en una solución;
a. precipitado-a, que sucede con rapidez.
References in classic literature ?
Left by their guide, the travelers remained a few minutes in helpless ignorance, afraid even to move along the broken rocks, lest a false step should precipitate them down some one of the many deep and roaring caverns, into which the water seemed to tumble, on every side of them.
After riding about an hour in this way, the whole party made a precipitate and tumultuous descent into a barn-yard belonging to a large farming establishment.
I felt as I imagine a husband may feel on a solitary holiday--if there are husbands unnatural enough to go holidaying without their wives--pleasantly conscious of a home tucked somewhere beneath the distant sunset, yet in no precipitate hurry to return there before the appointed day.
Hence then, and evil go with thee along Thy ofspring, to the place of evil, Hell, Thou and thy wicked crew; there mingle broiles, Ere this avenging Sword begin thy doome, Or som more sudden vengeance wing'd from God Precipitate thee with augmented paine.
His feudal tower must arise in due majesty; the figures which he introduces must have the costume and character of their age; the piece must represent the peculiar features of the scene which he has chosen for his subject, with all its appropriate elevation of rock, or precipitate descent of cataract.
But reason returned to me, and I was persuaded that this action could only precipitate a possible catastrophe.
If it were admitted that you who are dissatisfied hold the right side in the dispute, there still is no single good reason for precipitate action.
I am about to precipitate, to sink, to plunge myself into the abyss that is here before me, only to let the world know that while thou dost favour me there is no impossibility I will not attempt and accomplish.
Immediately the town of Alencon, speedily informed from the farther end of the rue de Saint-Blaise to the gate of Seez of this precipitate return, accompanied by singular circumstances, was perturbed throughout its viscera, both public and domestic.
Restraining my impatience -- for I was now under a strong temptation to rush blindly at my Visitor and to precipitate him into Space, or out of Flatland, anywhere, so that I could get rid of him -- I replied: --
The thought uppermost in her mind was that it was my father returned from his expedition, but the cunning of the Thark held her from headlong and precipitate flight to greet him.
There happened then that which you know, and of which your precipitate departure," added the host, with an acuteness that did not escape D'Artagnan, "appeared to authorize the issue.