precipitous


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pre·cip·i·tous

 (prĭ-sĭp′ĭ-təs)
adj.
1. Resembling a precipice; extremely steep. See Synonyms at steep1.
2. Having several precipices: a precipitous bluff.
3. Extremely rapid, hasty, or abrupt; precipitate: a precipitous collapse in prices. See Usage Note at precipitate.

[Probably from obsolete precipitious, from Latin praecipitium, precipice; see precipice.]

pre·cip′i·tous·ly adv.
pre·cip′i·tous·ness n.

precipitous

(prɪˈsɪpɪtəs)
adj
1. (Physical Geography) resembling a precipice or characterized by precipices
2. very steep
3. hasty or precipitate
preˈcipitously adv
preˈcipitousness n
Usage: The use of precipitous to mean hasty is thought by some people to be incorrect

pre•cip•i•tous

(prɪˈsɪp ɪ təs)

adj.
1. of the nature of a precipice: a precipitous wall of rock.
2. extremely steep: precipitous mountain trails.
[1640–50; < French précipiteux (now obsolete)]
pre•cip′i•tous•ly, adv.
pre•cip′i•tous•ness, n.

precipitous

, precipitate - Precipitous, "hasty, sudden and dramatic," is used in relation to physical or natural objects; precipitate, "done with great haste," relates to human actions or processes.
See also related terms for hasty.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.precipitous - done with very great haste and without due deliberation; "hasty marriage seldom proveth well"- Shakespeare; "hasty makeshifts take the place of planning"- Arthur Geddes; "rejected what was regarded as an overhasty plan for reconversion"; "wondered whether they had been rather precipitate in deposing the king"
hurried - moving rapidly or performed quickly or in great haste; "a hurried trip to the store"; "the hurried life of a city"; "a hurried job"
2.precipitous - extremely steepprecipitous - extremely steep; "an abrupt canyon"; "the precipitous rapids of the upper river"; "the precipitous hills of Chinese paintings"; "a sharp drop"
steep - having a sharp inclination; "the steep attic stairs"; "steep cliffs"

precipitous

adjective
1. sheer, high, steep, dizzy, abrupt, perpendicular, falling sharply a steep, precipitous cliff
2. hasty, sudden, hurried, precipitate, abrupt, harum-scarum the stock market's precipitous drop

precipitous

adjective
So sharply inclined as to be almost perpendicular:
Translations
شَديد الإنْحِدار
strmý
stejl
òverhníptur
çok dikuçurumlu

precipitous

[prɪˈsɪpɪtəs] ADJ
1. (= steep) → escarpado, cortado a pico
2. (= hasty) → precipitado, apresurado

precipitous

[prɪˈsɪpɪtəs] adj
(= steep) [cliff] → abrupt(e), à pic
(= sudden) [rise, drop] → vertigineux/euse
(= hasty) [decision] → précipité(e)

precipitous

adj
(= steep)steil
(= hasty)überstürzt

precipitous

[prɪˈsɪpɪtəs] adj (slope, path) → a precipizio; (decision, action) → precipitoso/a

precipice

(ˈpresipis) noun
a steep cliff.
precipitous (priˈsipitəs) adjective
very steep.
References in classic literature ?
The track now becoming narrow, they were obliged to pass in single file along the precipitous hillside, led by this escort.
The effect was as when the light, vapory clouds, with their soft coloring, suddenly vanish from the stony brow of a precipitous mountain, and leave there the frown which you at once feel to be eternal.
Theodule glacier, and fall headlong over precipitous rocks till they lose themselves in the mazes of the Gorner glacier.
Any one possessing a mile or two of secluded seaboard, cut off on the land side by precipitous approaches, and including a sheltered river mouth ingeniously hidden by nature, in the form of a jutting wall of rock, from the sea, might have made as good use of these natural opportunities as the nobleman in question, had they only been as wise and as rich.
It was possible, I reflected, that a mere different arrangement of the particulars of the scene, of the details of the picture, would be sufficient to modify, or perhaps to annihilate its capacity for sorrowful impression; and, acting upon this idea, I reined my horse to the precipitous brink of a black and lurid tarn that lay in unruffled lustre by the dwelling, and gazed down--but with a shudder even more thrilling than before--upon the remodelled and inverted images of the grey sedge, and the ghastly tree-stems, and the vacant and eye-like windows.
I had fallen into a precipitous ravine, rocky and thorny, full of a hazy mist which drifted about me in wisps, and with a narrow streamlet from which this mist came meandering down the centre.
A little way up the hill, for instance, was a great heap of granite, bound together by masses of aluminium, a vast labyrinth of precipitous walls and crumpled heaps, amidst which were thick heaps of very beautiful pagoda-like plants--nettles possibly--but wonderfully tinted with brown about the leaves, and incapable of stinging.
Country in which there are precipitous cliffs with torrents running between, deep natural hollows, confined places, tangled thickets, quagmires and crevasses, should be left with all possible speed and not approached.
There was a wall of granite on each side, high and precipitous, especially on our right, and so smooth that a few evergreens could hardly find foothold enough to grow there.
On reaching the second chain, called the Bighorn Mountains, where the river forced its impetuous way through a precipitous defile, with cascades and rapids, the travellers were obliged to leave its banks, and traverse the mountains by a rugged and frightful route, emphatically called the "Bad Pass.
Leaning very much against the precipitous incline of the deck, he would take a turn or two, perfectly silent, hang on by the compass for a while, take another couple of turns, and suddenly burst out:
Instead of finding the mountain we had ascended sweeping down in the opposite direction into broad and capacious valleys, the land appeared to retain its general elevation, only broken into a series of ridges and inter-vales which so far as the eye could reach stretched away from us, with their precipitous sides covered with the brightest verdure, and waving here and there with the foliage of clumps of woodland; among which, however, we perceived none of those trees upon whose fruit we had relied with such certainty.